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Author Archives: Tash Bright

Youth Clubs CLOSED (end of August)

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All Sheffield Futures Community Youth Teams youth clubs will be closed for the week of 27th August – 31st August.

Warehouse jobs in Sheffield!

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Are you looking for a warehouse job in Sheffield? Come to Sheffield Futures on Division St tomorrow 10-2 to book your guaranteed interview!

International Youth Day celebration!

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International Youth Day (12th August) is aimed to draw attention to youth issues and was started by United Nations in 2000. Every year, Sheffield Futures host their annual Youth Day celebration event, providing free fun activities, displays, information stands and more, for all the family.

This year’s theme for International Youth Day is ‘safe spaces for youth,’ something that Sheffield Futures is proud to provide across the city, with weekly youth clubs and their one-stop-shop for young people at Star House on Division Street.

“Youth need safe spaces where they can come together, engage in activities related to their diverse needs and interests, participate in decision making processes and freely express themselves.” say United Nations.

On Friday 10th August, Sheffield Futures held their celebration at Ice Sheffield. Over 300 young people and families attended the event and enjoyed face painting, football, henna, a graffiti workshop, bucking bronco, bungee run, music, hair glitter, a dance display and more.

Sheffield Futures corporate partners GB Boxing held a training session with three coaches for young people. GB Boxing prepare and train the boxers that compete for Great Britain at the Olympic Games and are based at English Institute of Sport.

Sheffield Futures organised a variety of youth organisations to provide information for attendees, with stalls from Duke of Edinburgh’s Award, Door 43 the emotional wellbeing service for young people, Talent Match SCR, Chilypep, Change Grow Live, Pet-Xi, Sheffield Alcohol Support Service, SAYiT, Sexual Health Sheffield and South Yorkshire Fire and Rescue.

At the event, Sheffield Youth Cabinet and Sheffield UK Youth Parliament asked where young people felt safe and here are the results:

  • 85% of young people felt safe where they live
  • 29% of young people did not feel safe in the city centre
  • 73% of young people felt safe at school
  • 70% of young people felt safe in public spaces
  • 62% of young people felt safe in open spaces
  • 13% of young people did not feel safe on public transport
  • 81% of young people felt safe in a youth club
  • 70% of young people felt safe in places of worship

The event was kindly sponsored by SIV, and would not have been possible without their support.

In Celebration of Youth Work

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By Gail Gibbons, Sheffield Futures Chief Executive Officer

Last month, Lloyd Russell-Moyle – MP for Brighton Kemptown, introduced a private members bill to Parliament which aims to impose a duty on local authorities to provide a minimum level of youth services. At the same time, the All Parliamentary Group for Youth Affairs, launched an inquiry on the role and sufficiency of youth work.

The response from statutory and voluntary organisations working with young people has been wide-ranging and heartfelt.

Research shows that between 2010 and 2018 more than 600 youth centres have been lost from local communities and that funding for youth work has fallen by 60% during the same time period.

The number of degree level youth work courses has fallen to their lowest level in a decade, and youth work training budgets have shrunk because of the priority towards training of related professions – particularly social work.

The impact of sustained under-funding has had a devastating effect on both the youth work profession, and on young people themselves – especially the most disadvantaged.

Since 2010, youth work has to all intents and purposes dropped off the national policy agenda. Responsibility has moved from the Department for Education – first to the Cabinet Office, and now to the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport – divorcing youth work from the wider young people’s policy agenda – including policy for vulnerable groups.

The government has also dropped its commitment to a three year stand-alone youth policy statement, and youth work is rarely, if ever, mentioned in government announcements or communications.

Meanwhile, the government has invested heavily in a range of new young people’s enrichment initiatives – the most high profile being the National Citizen Service (NCS) and the #IWill young people’s social action (volunteering) campaign. Whilst these initiatives undoubtedly enrich young people’s lives through building skills and confidence – as delivery partners for both initiatives, Sheffield Futures can vouch for that – they can in no way replace youth work; and there is evidence to suggest that not enough disadvantaged young people are being reached through these programmes.

Sheffield Future’s approach to work with young people is based on core youth work principles wherever possible. Our approach is relationship based – recognising the need to build up trust with young people over a sustained period of time; it is strengths based – identifying young people’s assets and building on them; it is flexible – working with young people at their own pace which is not always linear; it is co-produced with young people – young people usually have the solutions; and it utilises enrichment activities as a means of engagement.

Good quality youth work is more necessary now than ever before. In these times of austerity, young people are facing unprecedented challenges in the navigation of their daily lives.

In recent years, we have seen the growth in serious youth violence; risk of exploitation; and the rise in young people’s mental health and emotional well-being problems.

We have also seen the struggle for many young people to achieve at school and to gain meaningful employment, and to engage in positive activities outside formal education settings. Young people themselves tell us about the daily pressures they feel under.

A youth workforce that is skilled and equipped to engage and support young people is in high demand. Increasingly, local authorities, schools, the police and health services are recognising the unique skillset youth workers bring to the table in addressing some of the most difficult and complex societal challenges. It is ironic then that funding to develop and sustain the workforce is on the decline.

With this in mind, Sheffield Futures is committed to celebrating youth work and everything it brings.

We firmly believe that both open access youth work, at youth clubs, and targeted support using a youth work model, are essential pieces of a partnership approach to supporting young people towards a better future.

Our young people led campaign over the coming months is all about the celebration of youth work and showing what it can offer. We invite you to show your support by….

  • Joining us at our International Youth Day celebration (free fun for all the family: 12.30 – 3.30pm on Friday 10th August at Ice Sheffield.)
  • Sharing the following message on social media: Since 2010, funding to vital youth services has been cut, with 600+ youth centres closed. This is having a devastating effect on disadvantaged young people. At @SheffFutures we want to celebrate youth work and all of its fantastic achievements. See: www.sheffieldfutures.org.uk/in-celebration-of-youth-work
  • Running a fundraiser to help Sheffield Futures to continue delivering quality youth work to young people in Sheffield city region. Every penny you raise will help Sheffield Futures to transform lives and create positive futures.
  • Pledging to be a Sheffield Futures Ambassador and raising awareness of their work by making key introductions, sharing their messages, attending events and more.

Contact us, email: marketing@sheffieldfutures.org.uk or call: 0114 201 8647

 

A Level Results Day – expert advice!

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With A Level results day just around the corner, Sheffield’s students are coming to the end of a nerve wracking summer wait for those all-important grades. Many students will be celebrating on Thursday 16th August, but what happens if you don’t get the grades you want? To help navigate what can be a complicated process and to make sure students are prepared, local youth charity Sheffield Futures – responsible for delivering careers advice in many schools across Sheffield – is on hand to provide advice and guidance.

What to do if you don’t get the grades you need:

  1. Don’t panic. It’s important to stay calm so that you can act quickly. You are one of many young people who may not have the results they need to secure a place and if you’re panicking, you won’t be able to think clearly and act quickly to access the best courses left. It’s really useful to do some research before results day so that you’re fully prepared and have a plan B in your back pocket.
  2. Go on ‘UCAS Track’ to see if you have secured a place. If your ‘Track’ status hasn’t been updated, it means the university is still making a decision. Call them and ask if they will still take you. There may be a chance you will still be accepted if you have narrowly missed your grades. If your chosen institution (or your insurance offer, if you have one) won’t accept you then you will go into the UCAS clearing process.

However if ‘Track’ states that you’re in ‘Clearing’ then it means that you haven’t been offered a place, and you should keep calm – but act quickly.

  1. Check the UCAS website for all University places still available through clearing. The official list is published on ucas.com and many universities also publish their places on their own websites. If you’ve already done some research and know where else you would like to go, then you will have a head start. You don’t have to stick to your original choice, of course.

If you like the look of a course then call them. The idea is to persuade them to make you an informal offer over the phone. You will need your Clearing number and Personal ID.

  1. Again don’t panic and make sure you look at the clearing places and courses carefully. Consider what it might be like to live in that place. How far is it from home and is the course right for you? Try and visit if at all possible, especially if you haven’t already been to the university. Many of them hold clearing events in the days immediately following your results. It is useful to attend these, as they will give you a real feel for the place and the course.
  2. If you’re happy with the course and university and if they’ve made you an informal offer then make an official application through UCAS Track. Only do this if you have spoken to the university or college and have their agreement.

‘If you don’t get the grades you need to get in to university, the key thing is not to panic and be proactive. It’s important so you can act quickly, and make good decisions’ says Nigel Ball, All Age Guidance Manager at Sheffield Futures.

‘There’s a good chance that all may not be lost, as some institutions may still accept students who have only narrowly missed their grades.’ He continues.

‘A really important thing to do is to prepare in advance, and decide on second and third choices so that you can act quickly if you find yourself in the university clearing process. If you’ve got the details of these institutions to hand, you’re not going to be wasting valuable time researching. How quickly you act may be the difference between securing a place you will thrive in, versus one where you may not.’

Sheffield Futures provides the careers guidance and advice in schools across Sheffield.

Outside of school careers advice sessions, students can call Star House on 0114 2012800.

A level results day this year is Thursday 16th August 2018.

What it takes to succeed in digital marketing – by Evoluted

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Blog from our friends at Evoluted.

If you’re coming to the end of your studies and you’re starting to think about your career path, digital marketing could be a fantastic option.

Naturally, you’ll need to have skills relevant to the industry to work within it, but you might already possess these without having considered applying them in the digital sphere.

The digital marketing team at Sheffield-based digital agency Evoluted – who specialise in SEO, PPC and more – have put together the following video to help offer some more insight:

As the Evoluted team alludes to in the video, lots of the skills you need to excel in digital marketing are relevant across multiple industry disciplines:

  • Strong communication skills
  • Understanding how and why data should be used to influence decisions
  • Willingness to learn and apply new software skills
  • An ability to deliver results independently and as part of a team
  • Adaptability and being able to apply yourself across multiple business areas

In addition, passion and a natural flair for the job you want to do can also be priceless.

What Can You Do to Give Yourself a Head Start?

People come into digital marketing from a variety of backgrounds. Examples include:

  • A university degree such as Marketing, Business, Journalism or English
  • A college apprenticeship
  • Time spent running their own e-commerce business

Whilst qualifications are undeniably important, they are not the only thing employers look at when considering applicants. If you’ve run your own business on the side for example, or you’ve undertaken a relevant and fulfilling placement, these factors could prove equally vital to you being hired.

Essentially, anything you can do to improve your knowledge and understanding will do your chances the world of good.

Push hard for placement opportunities to set yourself apart from other applicants when it comes to the time to apply. Or, if you have a solid business or blog project idea, set up your own website and try to achieve strong results.

Some Reasons Why Digital Marketing Makes A Great Career Choice

With a career in the digital marketing industry, you’ll never need to feel boxed into one role. You can gravitate towards an area that suits you the best.

A natural flair for writing might lead you into a content-centric role for example. Or, an outstanding understanding of data could lead you into a PPC role. Alternatively, great communication skills could see you fulfil an outreach position. The options are vast.

No matter the role you decide to apply for, you’ll be entering what is a challenging, fulfilling and ever-evolving industry.

GET SORTED! Are you 16-18 and still looking for a training opportunity?

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GET SORTED!

Are you 16-18 and still looking for a training opportunity?

Join us on Wednesday 5th September 12-2pm at Sheffield Futures, Star House, 43 Division St, Sheffield, S1 4GE.

Come along and meet local training providers and have an informal chat about apprenticeships, traineeships, study programmes and other courses!

Work experience at Sheffield Futures

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My name is Jamie and I have just completed a two week work experience at Sheffield Futures as part of my Princes Trust Team programme. The Princes Trust programme is for young people and adults 16-30 years old and aims to support them to develop the skills and confidence needed to find paid work.  Below is my account of the work experience and what I learned about Sheffield Futures and about myself.

I knew a bit about Sheffield Futures before I started this work experience placement.  I used to attend youth clubs at Stocksbridge and Com.Unity when I was younger. When I turned 18, I started volunteering at Com.Unity and I have volunteered once or twice a week at Com.Unity since then (coming up to 3 years now).  Volunteering has given me the opportunity to build experience and to give something back to my local community and people I care about.

Over the last two weeks on my placement I have had the opportunity to work in a Sheffield Futures youth club called Leos. I helped to supervise the young people at Leos and supported them to get involved in activities like Hama bead sessions and walking in Norfolk Park.

I also spent some time with a Youth Worker, Aaron, and we worked in the Westfield area on detached and youth club sessions. We engaged with young people in the local area and I organised outdoor activities for them (including ‘football rounders’).

During my placement I also visited Star House and met Lee from the Involvement team. I learned about the number of things that Sheffield Futures do including in schools and youth centres. They do things like helping young people and adults find work, the UK Youth Parliament and lots more, including the different services that people have access to for the right support they need. Sheffield Futures also run the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award for young people and I was able to help sort and organise equipment that the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award team were going to use on one of their outdoor trips.

Overall I enjoyed it all and I achieved a lot out of this. I learned to be more outgoing, more talkative and more confident in new situations.

 At Leos I learned how to deal with lots of people with different learning difficulties and disabilities.  I am glad that I got to work at Leos youth club as it has given me more experience and given me more options on what sort of jobs I want to do. For anyone who wants to do their work placement with Sheffield Futures, do it, you will game so much experience out of it and it will be worth it.

International Youth Day – 10th August!

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International Youth Day is on Sunday 12th August and Sheffield Futures will be hosting our annual celebration on Friday 10th August at Ice Sheffield, Coleridge Rd, S9 5DA at 12.30-3.30pm.

This event is fun for all the family and a chance for young people from all over Sheffield to get together and enjoy sports, displays, graffiti, music and loads more.

The theme for International Youth Day is Safe Spaces, where young people can come together, engage in activities related to their diverse needs and interests, participate in decision making processes and freely express themselves. Sheffield Futures provides many of these spaces in Sheffield so we feel like it’s also a celebration of our hard work creating these spaces too.

Would you like to be involved?

We are looking for staff with hidden talents who may be able to face paint/do henna tattoos or screen printing! Whatever you can do that would be an activity for young people on the day, then please get in touch with Elliot Walker. (elliot.walker@sheffieldfutures.org.uk)

 

How to be employable (even if you haven’t got a job!)

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Our top five tips for Employability Day – 29th June!

1. Get a foot in the door

If there’s one thing every employer likes to see, it’s previous work experience. Many local companies are small businesses that look for workers who can fit in and get up to speed quickly. If you’ve already spent time in a workplace (and better still, have references from the employer) it will reassure them that you understand the basics, like the importance of turning up on time and working as a team.

If you’re still at college or uni then some part time work (provided it doesn’t get in the way of your studies) won’t just help the money go a bit further, it could really boost your job prospects.

Very few of us land our dream job straight away. Most of us have to play the long game and pick up skills and experience as we move towards our goal. Remember – it’s far easier to find a job if you’re already in work.

If you’re struggling to find a job because you don’t have experience then look at other ways into the market such traineeships, internships or volunteering.

2. Put a CV together

Your CV is your calling card. It’s a summary of what you can offer an employer in terms of skills, qualifications and experiences. Many companies use them instead of application forms. Once you have a CV, you can also send a copy to any organisation without even waiting for them to advertise a job. This is called a ‘speculative application’.

It’s really important to keep your CV up to date and to tweak it every time you make an application so that it matches the requirements of the job.

3. Be savvy with social media

There’s a good chance that a company will check out your social media profiles when you apply to them. Think about what kind of impression you want to give an employer and make sure anything on your profile that you wouldn’t want your boss to see is out of public view.

Once you’ve started moving up the career ladder, think about joining LinkedIn, an online professional network. Some of the biggest companies use LinkedIn profiles rather than CVs.

4. Work on your skills

There are certain skills – sometimes known as ‘core skills’ – that are required for almost any career. These include dealing with people, using clear English, handling numbers, talking to people on the phone, organising your own workload, solving problems, understanding IT (not just games). Can you think of any jobs where you wouldn’t need some if not most of these skills? Neither can we, so make sure they’re highlighted on your CV.

5. Learn from setbacks
It doesn’t matter how good or how well qualified you are, there will be times in your working life when things go wrong. What sets apart the most successful people is how they respond to failure. England manager, Gareth Southgate was dismissed by Middlesborough when they were fourth in the Championship and only one point off the top. Instead of complaining or hiding away, he rolled up his sleeves and started again.

If you mess up in an interview or at work, ask for feedback. Find out what went wrong and learn from it so that you do better next time.

If you would like some support with job search or preparing a CV, our careers advisers work in many schools and colleges across the city. We also run services at Star House for young people who have left school and for adults. To find out how we can help, give us a call on 0114 201 2800.

How you can help

Our charity is dedicated to helping Sheffield's young people to reach their full potential and achieve the best out of life, whatever their starting point. To help us to do more to support young people and communities we need your help. Just remember, every penny you donate will make a difference.