Author Archives: Sadie White

Youth Work Week 2018: Kirsty Roy

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It’s Youth Work Week this week and we’re talking to youth workers from across the organisation as part of our #youthworkmatters campaign to celebrate the varied ways our youth workers help young people from across the city.

Here we talk to Kirsty Roy a youth worker in our Door 43 emotional health and wellbeing service.

Kirsty Roy, youth worker – Door 43

What does your role as a youth worker involve?

It involves working with lots of different young people from all across the city to help them address emotional, practical and other  emotional health and wellbeing needs. I use my skills to relate to young people from all walks of life experiencing diverse problems, including problems that start in the home such as poverty, to problems in school whether it’s achievement or stress, to problems with low mood and depression.

How do you help Door 43 deliver for young people?

I help Door 43 deliver positive results for young people for example by giving them the tools and advice to help them get themselves into a better place emotionally which then sets them up to be able to deal with the challenges they face. It’s not about telling them what to do but it’s about coaching them and giving them the tools for example, coping strategies and building the resilience to cope with life’s set backs. Ultimately, I help them to uncover the answers and the right way forward for themselves.

What do you think are the challenges for young people?

I could go on forever. I think today’s young people have real challenges. From the current issues we have with knife crime and gang culture to dealing with the pressure of school without becoming stressed and anxious to problems at home such as poverty and peer on peer pressure. The list goes on. Young people are expected to deal with all of this when they’re young and inexperienced and don’t have the life experience and resilience to deal with it. It’s a really tough call.

How important is youth work to young people?

Very important. Absolutely essential. Without youth workers or youth clubs or anyone positive in a young persons life I can say I feel very sure that as well as the obvious detrimental effect and suffering for young people, the negative impact on our communities will be great. What I like about youth work is that it’s an early intervention for young people and it’s about giving them the information and tools to make positive choices. It gives them a positive influence which for some young people is unfortunately completely absent from their lives. We don’t tell them what to do we just advise them. The cut backs show that crime rates are going through the roof. I fear for what would happen if funding for youth services is cut back any more.

You can find out more about Door 43 here

Door43 – Emotional, mental and sexual health support

How you can support us:

Find out more about how youth work transforms lives by following our #YouthWorkMatters campaign on Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn and Facebook.

You can also write your own message of support for @SheffFutures using the hashtag #YouthWorkMatters

Please visit www.sheffieldfutures.org.uk to find out more about what we do and how you can support us with fundraising, volunteering or as an ambassador.

 

Youth Work Week 2018: Lucy Ruck

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It’s Youth Work Week this week and to continue our celebration of the varied ways our youth workers help young people from across the city, today we’re profiling Lucy Ruck, a youth worker in our Community Youth Team in the West of the city.

As you’ll have seen from these profiles, the roles are varied, but all focus on providing a holistic approach to stabilising the lives of some of our most vulnerable young people.

Case Study: How youth work can help support our most vulnerable young people

This case study tells the story of how collaboration between our specialist youth workers and targeted youth support workers can create sustained positive outcomes for vulnerable young people.

Katy had multiple barriers to learning, significant previous difficulties sustaining progress in education and training and was very unsettled emotionally and socially with an unstable home life.

Sheffield Futures youth worker, Ayesha had been working really hard to establish a positive relationship with Katy however she felt that support with education, employment and training would be really useful and set it up so joint specialist workers Ayesha and Lucy met with Katy together initially.

‘This went well, we got to know Katy’s hopes wishes and aspirations as well as trying to gain a more thorough understanding of her background, any learning needs and a holistic overview to inform the best choice of options.’ Says Lucy Ruck, Targeted Youth Support worker at Sheffield Futures.

‘Whilst the young person was saying that she wanted a “job” it was clear that she wasn’t job ready and whilst we encouraged her by updating her CV and giving ideas around job search I also talked to her about a wide range of options available including traineeships and other stepping stone courses.’ Lucy continues.

As a result, the joint effort resulted in appointments being made for two courses. ‘Katy needed a great deal of encouragement, phone calls, texts and e-mails as well as supporting to prepare and attend these interviews. This included engaging other agencies such as her social worker and advocating for support which was successful.’ Lucy says.

‘We both agreed that recognising the fine balance between encouraging Katy to be independent and responsible while at the same time supporting her to overcome her significant lack of confidence and the anxiety based upon previous negative experiences of education was essential.’

With much support (including wake up phone calls!) Katy started a four week course with the Princes Trust which she stayed on and passed! ‘She and we were delighted! It was clear that Katy had grown in confidence through this journey and it has given her a positive, consistent and sustained experience that will take her forward to a positive future.’

‘This is why we do this job, to see outcomes like this and it’s always so satisfying to be able to work collaboratively, pooling all of our skills and expertise to fight a young person’s corner and see them on a positive path.’ Says Lucy.

How you can support us:

Find out more about how youth work transforms lives by following our #YouthWorkMatters campaign on Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn and Facebook.

You can also write your own message of support for @SheffFutures using the hashtag #YouthWorkMatters

Please visit www.sheffieldfutures.org.uk to find out more about what we do and how you can support us with fundraising, volunteering or as an ambassador.

 

Youth Work Week 2018

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It’s Youth Work Week 5th to 11 November and time to celebrate the varied ways our youth workers help young people from across the city.

Here we talk to Lydia James, a case worker in our child sexual exploitation service and throughout next week we will profile other youth workers in different service areas.

As you’ll see the roles are varied, but all focus on providing a holistic approach to stabilising the lives of some of our most vulnerable young people.

Lydia James, Case Worker – Sheffield Sexual Exploitation Service

How important do you feel youth work is to the young people of Sheffield?

Youth work in my role is fundamental to recognising vulnerable young people and helping them to adjust their lifestyles or seek the help and support they need to get out of unsafe or risky situations and get onto a positive track. So really we are a safety net for some of the most vulnerable children and young people in our communities, providing the stability and support they may not have encountered during their lives which has ultimately left them vulnerable to exploitation.

The day to day lives of vulnerable young people are very different to young people with “normal” lifestyles. Being a youth worker you are able to differentiate between the two and understand the difficulties/barriers vulnerable young people face. We provide young people with someone in their lives to act as an advocate, to be their voice in formal situations when they are unable to vocalise their needs and wants and to fight their corner and to be their eyes and ears in the professional arena.

What does your role as a youth worker involve?

I work in the child sexual exploitation team at Sheffield Futures. My role involves working one to one with young people who have been identified as at risk of exploitation. These one to one sessions with at risk young people focus on sexual exploitation as the core issue but also offer the holistic support that is often required, so for example, support with mental health, wellbeing, family support and making the correct referrals on to the correct services. I also provide support with attending appointments such as health, counselling, housing, education and sexual health. Other parts of the role involve advocating for young people at statutory meetings that involve social care, the police, education and the courts.

How do you help your team to achieve its positive outcomes for young people?

To really help vulnerable young people it takes a non-judgemental approach and the ability to flex your style to have informal as well as formal discussions with young people. Just being there when you are needed by the young person is also important as young people have often come from unstable backgrounds and providing a stable influence is important. This also plays into the importance of building a reputation with a young person as a service that delivers and supports their needs. Good listening skills and not dictating, instructing or lecturing them on their lives, as well as helping young people to make informed decisions, accept mistakes and move them forward to prevent making the same mistakes again.

It’s also really important to keep up to date with specialist knowledge on current trends and issues within Sheffield for example, knife crime, changes in substance use, hotspot areas and culture changes.

What do you think the challenges are for young people?

A big challenge for young people and for those with the role of supporting them is a general mistrust of services, sometimes as a result of negative experiences.

Lengthy waiting lists and the amount of time that it takes to gain an appointment can be a barrier to young people getting the help they need. Young people often ask for support when they need it right there and then- they find it difficult to pre-empt when they need support and often only ask when they are at crisis point.

And a big one for me is young people believing things cannot change – even if support is in place. Young people often have negative views of themselves/ cannot see a way out of situations/ cannot “see light at the end of the tunnel”.

Sheffield Sexual Exploitation Service

How you can support us:

Find out more about how youth work transforms lives by following our #YouthWorkMatters campaign on Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn and Facebook.

You can also write your own message of support for @SheffFutures using the hashtag #YouthWorkMatters

Please visit www.sheffieldfutures.org.uk to find out more about what we do and how you can support us with fundraising, volunteering or as an ambassador.

 

 

World Mental Health Day 2018: Katie Ludlam, GB Boxing Performance Psychologist shares her thoughts on the role of sport in building essential life skills

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Here Katie Ludlam, Performance Psychologist at GB Boxing spends ten minutes talking about how sport can play an important role in building essential life skills.

How do you think getting involved in boxing or sport could benefit a young person struggling with emotional health issues for example, confidence, low mood or anxiety?

‘Being involved in boxing can facilitate an environment where you are on a journey with like-minded people and are judged for the things you can typically control for example commitment, hard work, and a willingness to try. Boxing – and sport in general – can change and will continue to change people’s lives.  I believe sport has the potential to teach us how to overcome setbacks, build relationships with others, enhance self belief and give us purpose/ something to strive for.’

Can you recommend any techniques for building resilience, self-esteem and confidence?

‘Learning from our experiences and committing to what is going to make a positive difference for us. What do you value or want to achieve? Identify what is getting in the way and the things you are doing that take you away from your values/goals. What behaviours could we commit to that will be a positive move towards our values/goals?’

‘Ensuring that you prioritise time to consider and build on the positive things of your day, your life, or the things you are trying to achieve is so important. How often do we ask ourselves what is going well/ what have I achieved today/ what is working for me?’

‘I believe that everyone has unique qualities and capabilities (super-strengths!) that if identified and maximised can strengthen our belief, self-determination, and performance in whatever it is we are doing.’

How important is resilience, self-esteem and confidence to the mentality of a Boxer?

‘I think these things naturally fluctuate depending on recent experiences and what someone has going on in their lives. That said, we don’t get through life without experiencing setbacks and these can be great for our development – being able to pick yourself up off the canvas and dust yourself off (both literally and metaphorically) is difficult but as they say (whoever they are!), it sure does make us stronger if we commit to learning from it.’

‘Belief in yourself and your ability to succeed in what you are doing is important, but there is an assumption that the best boxers don’t experience doubt – for me confidence isn’t the absence of self-doubt, we all have doubts, it is our ability to accept doubts, not judge ourselves about them, and continue/succeed despite the doubts we have.’

GB Boxing, based at the English Institute of Sport, prepares and trains the boxers that compete for Great Britain at the Olympic Games and chose Sheffield Futures as its charity partner. The three year partnership will focus on the use of boxing as a tool to bolster Sheffield Futures’ community involvement work and to inspire Sheffield’s young people to achieve wider personal development through sport.

World Mental Health Day 2018: Launch of new emotional wellbeing ‘Health Zone’ at Star House

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A newly refurbished ‘Health Zone’ which has been purposely designed by and for young people to access support with their emotional and physical health is open for Sheffield’s young people. 

The ‘Health Zone’ at Sheffield Futures on Division Street will host the Door 43 Wellbeing Café. Our Door 43 service is a preventative mental health service for 13-25 year olds that aims to stop mental health conditions in their tracks before they turn into full blown crises. Since its inception the service has been very much in demand with the majority self referring with issues such as stress, anxiety and low mood often caused by the overwhelming demands that modern life places on today’s young people.

With half of all mental health conditions appearing in young people before the age of 14 and one in four adults suffering a mental health problem in any given year, new services like Door 43 are heralded nationally as the way forward.

 Door 43 integrates a range of health and wellbeing support under one roof, giving young people the flexibility they need in terms of access to different specialist support services such as counselling and other psychological therapies, awareness and advice work, health clinics, signposting and mechanisms for referral for those who require specialist mental health assessment. It is this preventative approach that aims to stop young people from requiring expensive, statutory, crisis-led interventions that often come when the damage has already been done. 

Commenting on the new health and wellbeing zone development, Gail Gibbons, CEO at Sheffield Futures says, ‘We are thrilled to have completed the work on our new Health Zone for young people, based at Sheffield Futures’ city centre venue Star House. Sheffield Futures has received incredibly generous grant funding from the Department of Health and other local organisations and we are looking to match funds to cover building costs, furnishing and more.’

‘We have seen very encouraging results from Door 43 so far and it’s really heartening to see the positive impact we’re having on the mental health and emotional wellbeing of Sheffield’s young people.’

‘We know that young people can be put off accessing mental health services as they associate these environments with the stress and anxiety that is often fuelling their issues.

The new health and wellbeing zone will offer a safe and welcoming space for young people to openly talk about their feelings and access early preventative support in a completely neutral environment where they can literally get away from it all, clear their head and become ready to access the support they need.’

If you want to have a look at how our new health zone is developing check out this video:

Case Study: When talking about how the Door 43 service has helped him, Darren Jenks a young person who has accessed Door 43 in the past said, “Door43 is a place I can go and offload about what has happened in my week. I don’t feel judged by the staff; they are all so easy to talk to. I feel like having that space every week makes a massive difference to my mood.” 

“When I’ve got loads of stuff going on in my head, I can book in to see someone at Door43 and they help me to make sense of it all and we can make a plan together and I feel so much better.”

All those interested in discussing how they can offer financial or other support should contact Tash Bright at Sheffield Futures on 0114 2018647 or email: marketing@sheffieldfutures.org.uk

Knife crime: Emergency first aid training for young people #YouthWorkMatters

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Young people at Sheffield Futures’ youth clubs have received training in how to deliver first aid on the street if they come across someone bleeding. This training comes as part of the city’s response to Operation Spectre, the National Knife Crime Awareness Campaign.

The sessions at youth clubs in Abbeydale and Gleadless were facilitated by Street Doctors – University of Sheffield medical students who deliver emergency life-saving skills to young people. The group were joined by South Yorkshire Police who spoke to the young people about knife crime in Sheffield and how to report crime anonymously through youth crime watch tool Fearless. Fearless is a service that allows information to be passed to the police anonymously.

The emergency first aid sessions were delivered to young people aged 11-16 with a focus on education around the devastating consequences of knife crime and carrying a knife.
Street Doctors ensured that the young attendees were aware of the location of vital organs within the body, the dangers and warning signs of blood loss and initial first aid should they ever be in the situation where they find themselves present with a victim of a stabbing. Funding for the session was secured from Sheffield Youth Justice Service.

Further to this, Sheffield Futures youth workers have been working with PCSOs to support young people in the community by providing joint patrols in Sharrow, Gleadless and Upperthorpe as part of Operation Sceptre.

Sheffield Futures Head of Targeted Services and Health, Dan White said, “Sheffield Futures is working closely with multi-agency teams to support young people and prevent knife crime. We are working in the community with young people to help them to understand the dangers of carrying a knife and with community groups to ensure that our support is targeted.”

“Our approach is based on core youth work principles: relationship based – recognising the need to build up trust with young people over a sustained period of time; it is strengths based – identifying young people’s assets and building on them; it is flexible – working with young people at their own pace which is not always linear; it is co-produced with young people – young people usually have the solutions; and it utilises enrichment activities as a means of engagement.”

PC Mark Toyne, who attended the session, said, “The Street Doctors delivered their presentation expertly and had a genuine rapport with their young audience. Our thanks to Sheffield Futures and Street Doctors for involving themselves in Operation Sceptre and for delivering such a valuable input.”


Sheffield Futures new campaign ‘In Celebration of Youth Work’ celebrates and demonstrates the value of youth work within our communities.

Since 2010, funding to vital youth services has been cut, with 600+ youth centres closed. This is having a devastating effect on disadvantaged young people.

Our young people led campaign over the coming months is all about the celebration of youth work and all of its fantastic achievements. We invite you to show your support by….

  • Sharing the following message on social media: Since 2010, funding to vital youth services has been cut, with 600+ youth centres closed. This is having a devastating effect on disadvantaged young people. At @SheffFutures we want to celebrate youth work and all of its fantastic achievements. See: www.sheffieldfutures.org.uk/in-celebration-of-youth-work
  • …Or write your own message of support for @SheffFutures using the hashtag #YouthWorkMatters
  • Running a fundraiser to help Sheffield Futures to continue delivering quality youth work to young people in Sheffield city region. Every penny you raise will help Sheffield Futures to transform lives and create positive futures.
  • Pledging to be a Sheffield Futures Ambassador and raising awareness of their work by making key introductions, sharing their messages, attending events and more.

Contact us, email: marketing@sheffieldfutures.org.uk or call: 0114 201 8647

Sexual Health Week 2018: Safe sex & consent

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It’s Sexual Health Awareness Week next week 24 – 30 September. This year the theme is consent.

Consent means agreeing to do something and when it comes to sex it means agreeing to take part in sexual activity.

Brook is the leading sexual health charity for young people under the age of 25 and has some great resources on its website relating to safe sex and consent.

Check out this link to find out more about consent and your rights, including age of consent, sex, consent and your rights, enthusiastic consent and what is sexual harassment?

Also check out this video, Sex is like tea – which explains whether it’s tea or sex, consent is everything.

Help with sexual health

If you feel like you could benefit from talking face to face with someone about sexual health and how to protect yourself then come and talk to one of our friendly staff at Door 43 who can help out with things like providing condoms, pregnancy tests as well as basic STI screening.

If you feel like you want to talk to someone in confidence about any of these services please come in to Star House between 11am and 3pm Monday to Friday.

Help for those who may be at risk of sexual exploitation

Here at Sheffield Futures we also run a service for children under 18 who may be at risk of being sexually exploited. If you feel you need help or may be vulnerable in this way we can help.

Child sexual exploitation can happen to anyone. It is never the young person’s fault and there is help available.

Is this you?

  • You are under 18
  • You are friends with older adults
  • You have an older boyfriend or girlfriend
  • You stay out late and even all night
  • You don’t stay in with your family and friends your own age very much
  • You don’t go to school
  • You have tried drugs and alcohol
  • You chat to people online who you have never met
  • You are sending or receiving inappropriate images
  • Sometimes people don’t know where you are

Help is here waiting for you.

If you have answered ‘yes’ to any of the questions above, the Sheffield Sexual Exploitation Service can help you. Call us in the strictest of confidence now on 0114 201 8645. You’re not to blame for what’s been happening and you are not going to get into trouble. Help is here waiting for you so call us on 0114 201 8645 or email sses@sheffieldfutures.org.uk in the strictest of confidence.

 

Celebrating our young people giving back to the community

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Sheffield Futures celebrated the achievements made by our 111 young people on the National Citizen Service programme this week.

Over the course of 4 weeks this summer young people aged 17 and 18 from across Sheffield came together to work on social action projects that would directly benefit the local community.

During the four weeks, our young people spent time on an outdoor residential, undertaking adventurous activities, learning to work as a team, developing leadership skills and pushing themselves to achieve things they never thought possible.

In weeks two and three, young people developed life skills by spending time close to home as well as undertaking a social action project for a local charity. Our NCS graduates supported local charities with fundraising initiatives and care packages including those for the City’s homeless. Those that benefited included young people in our own community youth teams and the Door 43 emotional health and wellbeing service along with Chilypep, Water Aid, Bluebell Wood, Richmond Care Home, Roundabout, Sheffield Mind, Archer Project and Sheffield Children’s Hospital.

‘We’re so proud of all the fantastic young people that have gone on the National Citizen Service journey with us this Summer. What a brilliant achievement to challenge yourself in such an all-encompassing way, living away from home and working as part of a team to benefit those in need within our community.’ Says Gail Gibbons, CEO of Sheffield Futures.

‘We know from our celebration event that the young people involved gained a lot of life skills and positive experiences from the NCS programme this year and we look forward to welcoming the next set of young people onto the programme.’ Gail continues.

Sheffield Futures is one of the delivery partners for the National Citizen Service in Sheffield.

Celebrating Youth Work: Alisha’s Story #YouthWorkMatters

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As part of our Celebrating Youth Work campaign we’re looking at the diverse ways in which youth workers have a life changing impact on the lives of Sheffield’s most vulnerable children and young people.

Here we hear from Rhonda, a Youth Worker in our Community Youth Team about her experiences working with a young girl at risk of Child Sexual Exploitation who with the intervention and engagement of our youth workers and other specialists was steered into a place of safety.

‘Alisha was a young Lithuanian girl living with her Mother in Sheffield. Alisha was assessed as being at risk of Child Sexual Exploitation and as a result of her mother’s personal issues and concerns for Alisha’s safety we referred the case to social care and Alisha was placed into foster care with supervised visits from her mother.’ Says Rhonda.

‘As part of our referral process we undertook an assessment and intervention plan to ensure that Alisha was capable of making informed and positive choices. As part of this I built up a trusting relationship and worked on topics such as self-esteem, positive choices, consequences and healthy relationships. Other issues were identified and we helped Alisha with issues around theft and smoking. Alisha engaged well with all her one to one sessions and eventually she gained confidence to attend youth provision in her local area where she made positive friendships.’ She continues.

After some time, it was agreed that as part of the child protection plan Alisha was on it was in her interests to be returned to Lithuania to live with her maternal grandparents.

‘As I had built such a strong relationship with Alisha, Alisha’s social worker asked me to accompany Alisha back to Lithuania.’ Rhonda says. 

‘The social worker and I picked up Alisha at 2am and it was a tearful goodbye for her and her foster carer. We arrived at the airport and boarded our flight to Frankfurt and then boarded another flight to Lithuania. Alisha was glad to be going back home but said that she would miss living in the UK and her friends, however she had a loving relationship with her grandparents.’

‘The young girl’s grandparents, social workers, her cousin and her husband and new born baby were all waiting for her arrival and it was an exciting moment for her and her family as there were lots of hugs and we were introduced to the family. We said our good byes and it was emotional for the social worker and I. The Lithuanian social workers were kind enough to call a taxi for us and waited with us for the taxi and we left the young girl with her family at the airport to start a more positive life with her family to support and care for her.’ Rhonda says.

The case with CYT has since been closed following no further concerns and a positive transition for Alisha back to her family in Lithuania.


Sheffield Futures new campaign ‘In Celebration of Youth Work’ celebrates and demonstrates the value of youth work within our communities.

Since 2010, funding to vital youth services has been cut, with 600+ youth centres closed. This is having a devastating effect on disadvantaged young people.

Our young people led campaign over the coming months is all about the celebration of youth work and all of its fantastic achievements. We invite you to show your support by….

  • Sharing the following message on social media: Since 2010, funding to vital youth services has been cut, with 600+ youth centres closed. This is having a devastating effect on disadvantaged young people. At @SheffFutures we want to celebrate youth work and all of its fantastic achievements. See: www.sheffieldfutures.org.uk/in-celebration-of-youth-work
  • …Or write your own message of support for @SheffFutures using the hashtag #YouthWorkMatters
  • Running a fundraiser to help Sheffield Futures to continue delivering quality youth work to young people in Sheffield city region. Every penny you raise will help Sheffield Futures to transform lives and create positive futures.
  • Pledging to be a Sheffield Futures Ambassador and raising awareness of their work by making key introductions, sharing their messages, attending events and more.

Contact us, email: marketing@sheffieldfutures.org.uk or call: 0114 201 8647

World Suicide Prevention Day

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It’s World Suicide Prevention day on Monday 10th September. If you’re dealing with low mood, feeling worthless and like you can’t carry on please make yourself safe. You can reach out immediately to the following organisations:

Sheffield Mental Health Helpline: 0808 801 0440 (24 hours a day, free phone number)

HOPELineUK: 0800 068 41 41 (Open Monday to Friday 10am – 5pm; 7pm – 10pm and Weekends 2pm – 5pm).

Samaritans: 08457 90 90 90 / jo@samaritans.org

Childline: 0800 1111 / http://www.childline.org.uk (http://www.childline.org.uk)

Sheffield mental health out of hours: 0114 2716310 / OOHduty@shsc.nhs.uk (Adult services)

If you need urgent medical attention call 999 or attend your local A&E.

Young people 16 and under are advised to attend A&E at the Sheffield Children’s Hospital (Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TH)

Young people 17 and over are advised to attend A&E at the Northern General Hospital. (Herries Rd, Sheffield S5 7AU)


Remember, you can reach out to us here at Door43 at any time to prevent your feelings getting to crisis point. Door43 is a safe, confidential and relaxed space staffed by qualified workers where you can talk to a friendly face about anything that may be on your mind.

If you don’t feel like talking that’s fine too, you can come to our drop in session and ‘just be’ with other young people. It can be fun too!

You can drop in to Door43 here at Star House on Division Street 11-3pm Monday to Friday and 9.30 -12.30 on Saturdays.

There is also our Wellbeing Café, every Tuesday from 5pm – 7pm where you can relax with other young people, staffed by qualified workers and supporters all dedicated to provide a listening ear.

How you can help

Our charity is dedicated to helping Sheffield's young people to reach their full potential and achieve the best out of life, whatever their starting point. To help us to do more to support young people and communities we need your help. Just remember, every penny you donate will make a difference.