Door43

Mental health awareness week 2019: Social media. Remember, IT’S NOT REAL LIFE

Sadie White No Comments

Mental health awareness week 2019: Body image

Social media lifestyle: Remember, IT’S NOT REAL LIFE

Mental Health Awareness Week takes place 13-19 May 2019. The theme this year is Body image – how we think and feel about our bodies. This year Door 43 – the emotional health and wellbeing service at youth charity Sheffield Futures is building on this theme and raising awareness of the importance of remembering it’s not real life, when faced with mega edited selfies and seemingly perfect lifestyles on the likes of Instagram as well as aps that allow you to self-edit your image like FaceTune.

‘Body image can have a massive impact on young peoples’ self-esteem and confidence. The way they think they are viewed by others and the way they picture themselves in their minds and even in the mirror can make young people feel uncomfortable in their own skin, anxious, unhealthy or disempowered.’ Says Rochelle Lowe, Health and Wellbeing Practitioner at Sheffield Futures.

‘The media including social media has a massive role to play in what young people see as ‘normal’ and the amount of time spent online alongside the prevalence of online tools such as FaceTune – which literally allow you to alter your image – means it’s getting more and more difficult for young people to stay in reality.’

‘Too much exposure to Instagram, where people’s lives are so perfect, can make young people feel like they are failing and now with the onset of aps that actually let you make changes to the way you look too can be incredibly damaging. They reinforce negative feelings about body image and can ultimately lead to more serious emotional health problems such as anxiety low self-esteem as well as encouraging cyber bullying where young people literally feel like they can’t get away from negative attitudes.’

It’s encouraging to see that some Insta sensations such as Essena O’Neil have actively rejected their Insta lives and instead are exposing the unrealistic images they have previously posted as ‘Not real life’ with the aim of raising awareness of the damage unrealistic images can do to self-esteem and in some cases mental and physical health.

‘All the images we see are edited in some way and are in no way a true representation of that person’s life. Trying to live up to said pictures is simply unachievable without hurting yourselves. The sooner we realise it’s not real the better.’ Says Kate Hardy, Sheffield Futures Young Advisor and ex Member of Youth Parliament for Sheffield.

Door 43’s top tips for a positive body image

  • Limit your exposure to social media: Reduce your amount of social and media access. Be aware of images, slogans, or attitudes that make you feel bad about yourself or your body and remember that these images may have been edited. If someone or something is making you feel bad online then avoid it as far as you can. If it gets out of control then report it to a responsible adult.
  • Keep a top-10 list of things you like about yourself: Things that are not related to how much you weigh or what you look like. Read your list often.
  • Remind yourself that true beauty is not skin-deep: Look at yourself as a whole person, beauty is a state of mind and not a state of body.
  • Surround yourself with positive friends and family: It is easier to feel good about yourself and your body when you are around people of the same age or family who are supportive and who boost your self-confidence by praising you, making you feel good about yourself.
  • Treat your body kindly: Do nice things for yourself to relax like having a bubble bath, exercising, eating healthily and drinking lots of water as well as doing things like sport, arts and cultural activities that you are good at and you enjoy.

About Door 43

Door43 offers Sheffield’s 13 – 25 year olds support on a range of social, emotional, practical and health related issues.

Door43 at Sheffield Futures on Division Street is staffed by youth workers, counsellors, substance misuse workers, sexual health workers, careers advisors, volunteers as well as peer supporters.

Young people can drop in at Door43, Sheffield Futures, Division Street on Wednesdays. Please call 0114 201 2800 for further information and appointments.

You can find out more about the activities and workshops on offer on the Sheffield Futures website www.sheffieldfutures.org.uk/i-need-help/door43/

We also run a social prescribing service for young people aged 13-25. Much like going to the GP for a prescription if you’re physically ill, we can work with you to prescribe activities, services and practical support that can help with a range of issues you may be facing such as:

  • Loneliness and isolation: We can help you to make new friends or find groups to make connections with others through activities you’re interested in
  • Difficulty accessing housing, education or employment: We can provide practical support to make housing applications, coach you to understand opportunities for further education or with getting back into work
  • Low confidence, mood, wellbeing: We can support you to find ways to build confidence, improve mood and boost wellbeing and tackle any underlying issues you may have.

For those that would rather, there is also the option to book appointments.

If you know a young person or young people that you feel may benefit from the service you can refer them to the service by calling 0114 201 2774.

Exam season 2019: Top tips from Door 43 on managing exam stress

Sadie White No Comments

We’re fully into exam season with Sheffield’s young people taking SATs, GCSEs and A levels over the coming weeks. That’s why our Door 43 emotional health and wellbeing workers have put together their top tips for young people sitting their exams this year.

Taking exams can be a real trigger for stress in young people who without the strategies to effectively deal with stress can find themselves becoming completely unable to focus, take in the information when revising and ultimately do themselves justice in the exam hall.

How to spot the signs that a young person isn’t dealing well with exam stress

‘If your child seems worried, tense and is getting headaches or tummy pains, isn’t sleeping and is more irritable than usual these can be signs that productive pressure is turning into negative stress.’ says Rochelle Lowe, Health & Wellbeing Practitioner at Door 43.

‘They may also lose interest in food or eat more than normal or seem disinterested in activities they usually enjoy, or just seem negative and low in their mood.’ Rochelle continues.

‘If you’re a parent or carer it’s important to spot these signs so you can intervene and support them and help to keep things in perspective.’

Top tips for young people to help deal with exam stress

  1. Create a revision timetable, that includes regular comfort breaks
  2. As part of this, prioritise the subjects you feel less confident in but make sure your plan covers all subjects
  3. Remove distractions such as mobile phones/tablets/ games consoles
  4. Get regular exercise even if it’s a walk around the house/garden and some fresh air
  5. Eat healthy snacks and drink plenty of water
  6. Avoid social media to stop procrastinating
  7. Recognise if you’re over doing it, if you begin to feel stressed or anxious take a break
  8. On the day of the exam don’t try to cram
  9. Make sure you have a healthy breakfast, even if all you can manage is a banana & plenty of water
  10. Remember once you’re in the exam hall, don’t panic. If you feel overwhelmed take deep breaths and re-focus
  11. Once the exam is finished and you’re out of the exam hall, don’t go away and obsess about things you can’t change, for example working out your mark. Look forwards, focus on the next exam or celebrate that you have one less exam to do!

About Door 43

Door43 offers Sheffield’s 13 – 25 year olds support on a range of social, emotional, practical and health related issues.

Door43 at Sheffield Futures on Division Street is staffed by youth workers, counsellors, substance misuse workers, sexual health workers, careers advisors, volunteers as well as peer supporters.

Young people can drop in at Door43, Sheffield Futures, Division Street. Wednesday 11-4pm. For other times please call 0114 201 2800.

You can find out more about the activities and workshops on offer on the Sheffield Futures website www.sheffieldfutures.org.uk/i-need-help/door43/

We also run a social prescribing service for young people aged 13-25. Much like going to the GP for a prescription if you’re physically ill, we can work with you to prescribe activities, services and practical support that can help with a range of issues you may be facing such as:

  • Loneliness and isolation: We can help you to make new friends or find groups to make connections with others through activities you’re interested in
  • Difficulty accessing housing, education or employment: We can provide practical support to make housing applications, coach you to understand opportunities for further education or with getting back into work
  • Low confidence, mood, wellbeing: We can support you to find ways to build confidence, improve mood and boost wellbeing and tackle any underlying issues you may have

If you know a young person or young people that you feel may benefit from the service you can refer them to the service by calling 0114 201 2774.

NHS Sheffield investing in children and young people’s mental health: Door 43

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NHS Sheffield Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) have announced they will be investing in children and young people’s mental health support.

This funding has been committed in partnership with Sheffield City Council, as part of Sheffield’s Emotional Wellbeing and Mental Health Strategy for Children and Young People.

The funding, which was agreed at the CCG’s governing body earlier this year, will come in to place in April 2019. Some of the funding will be used to sustain and expand Door 43, which is based at Star House in Sheffield city centre and provided by Sheffield Futures and Sheffield Children’s NHS Foundation Trust.

Door 43 provides a holistic range of support for young people aged 13-25 including support for mild emotional wellbeing issues, education and wider social and personal support. The aim of Door 43 is to support young people at the earliest possible point, before their needs escalate and they require more specialist support.

Dr Girish Vaidya, Associate Clinical Director at NHS Sheffield CCG and Clinical Director at Sheffield Children’s NHS Foundation Trust Community Wellbeing and Mental Health Division, said: “We will be increasing investment into Door 43 by 45% in recognition of the positive impact the service has had, and the positive feedback we have received from young people.

“This investment will help enable Door 43 to expand to support a greater number of young people. This expansion also supports one of the key aims of our Emotional Wellbeing and Mental Health Strategy, which is to increase early intervention support for children and young people’s mental health in Sheffield.”

The money provided by NHS Sheffield CCG will also go towards sustaining a number of transformation projects, including work to engage young people in commissioning and services provided by Sheffield Children’s NHS Foundation Trust.

Dan White, Head of Targeted Services and Health at Sheffield Futures said: “We are delighted for the funding that has been committed by NHS Sheffield CCG to sustain and expand Door 43, our emotional wellbeing service for young people. 

It is fantastic that the Clinical Commissioning Group have recognised the value of our Door 43 service, providing a holistic range of support at the earliest possible point, preventing existing conditions worsening to crisis levels, whilst improving coping mechanisms and increasing resilience.

Door 43 has worked with over 200 young people in the last 12 months helping young people manage their mental health and emotional wellbeing enabling them to stay in work or education and head towards achieving their full potential. 

This funding will allow Sheffield Futures to grow the service, delivering support for 13-25 year olds in the community, for those who are unable to, and do not wish to, access services in the city centre. This is vital for Door 43, to reach young people where they feel most comfortable, and we are delighted that we will be able to offer this service shortly.”

Councillor Jackie Drayton, Cabinet Member for Children, Young People and Families said: “What a fantastic investment into children’s mental health, I can’t express the importance of helping our children and young people to get the support they need. There’s a great number of services in Sheffield, including the ‘Future in Mind’ work in schools, our online counselling service launching in April and the great work at Door 43 and I’m thrilled that this large amount of money will be put into these services, making them easier to access and helping young people get support at the very earliest opportunity.”

This recurrent investment reflects NHS Sheffield CCG’s commitment to investing in children and young people’s mental health, in line with the NHS Long Term Plan. They continue to work with partners to further improve support for, and investment in, children and young people’s mental health across the city.

Jenny’s story: recording in a studio through social prescribing

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Jenny moved to Sheffield in April 2018 “with just a suitcase and a guitar.” Earlier that year, she had felt the push to leave the seaside town she had been living in to move to Sheffield the “music city.” Jenny was excited about “all the music venues, nightlife and students” and moved to do what she wanted to do – make music.

Alone in a city she didn’t know, Jenny was working in hospitality, living in a shared house and her mental health began to deteriorate. Seeking help after a mental health crisis, she was referred to Door 43, the emotional wellbeing service for young people at Sheffield Futures.

“From the first moment I visited Door 43, I felt like I was listened to,” she said. “Door 43 was a really warm and welcoming environment and I felt that when I told my story, that my worker really listened.”

Jenny began to visit the weekly Wellbeing Café, a drop-in session filled with positive activities, staff and volunteers to talk to, cups of tea and inspirational talks from sportspeople, musicians and more about their own mental health stories.

Jenny’s worker encouraged her to follow her dreams and to do what she wanted to do when she moved to the city, make music. Together they worked on exercises to increase Jenny’s confidence and began to look to the future and exploring Jenny’s passions.

Jenny found herself out of work and unhappy with her living situation. One of her coping strategies was playing her guitar and writing songs about her feelings, and unfortunately she had to sell her guitar to pay her rent. Her worker knew how much this meant to her and through a social media shout-out, managed to get Jenny a kindly donated guitar and keyboard within 24 hours.

Jenny said: “The guitar and keyboard kept me alive.”

Jenny moved out of her shared accommodation into a house on her own and began feeling much better.

When Door 43 held a grand opening for their premises, with Sheffield City Region Mayor Dan Jarvis, they asked Jenny to perform one of her songs. It was Jenny’s first public performance in over a year, and her first in Sheffield. She said: “No-one in Sheffield had heard my music and I was really nervous, but it went really well. Afterwards I felt so much more confident and I got some great feedback.”

Through Sheffield Futures social prescribing programme, Jenny was introduced to Nigel Humberstone, who runs Beehive Works, a music studio in Sheffield. He had kindly offered studio time and assistance for Jenny to record an EP of songs about her mental health. Jenny said: “Recording my music is something I’ve always wanted to do. I used to record my songs on voice notes on my phone! Nigel and Klive have been so helpful and have made sure that everything has been done properly. I feel like there are no limits on what I can achieve now.”

Jenny has launched a Bandcamp, where people can hear and buy her music. She has finished recording five songs about her mental health journey and is looking forward to playing some shows over the summer. She said: “I’ve had to be patient and work hard to record these songs, everything takes longer than you think it will – but I’m excited to start gigging over summer. I’m being realistic and trying to be organised, but I’ll always be a dreamer.”

National Social Prescribing Day – 14th March

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StreetGames becomes nationwide social prescriber in local communities

Sports charity funds link workers in four UK cities to tackle social issues among young people

National sports charity StreetGames has funded four link workers to support young people accessing local sources of support in four cities across the UK. The programme will allow young people to have access to free counselling, sport and volunteering opportunities, and will support with literacy, training or employment.

These appointments follow StreetGames being selected as one of 23 new schemes across the country to share in £4.5 million of funding from the Department of Health & Social Care (DHSC). The grant means StreetGames will be able to support local partners in Brighton & Hove, Luton, Sheffield and Southampton, to work with vulnerable young people, aged 5-25, helping them to get extra care and support in their local neighbourhood.

StreetGames has partnered with YMCA DownsLink Group in Brighton & Hove, No Limits in Southampton, Sheffield Futures in Sheffield, and Active Luton in Luton, who will provide physical hubs from where the service will be coordinated.

Talking on the announcement, Paul Jarvis-Beesley, Head of Sport and Health at StreetGames, said: “Social prescribing refers to the process of helping patients to improve their health, wellbeing and social welfare, by connecting them to a range of local, non-clinical, community services which might be run by the council or a local charity. This is something StreetGames is very passionate about. Through the programme, a dedicated link worker will spend time with each young person finding out what they need and make the connection to the menu of local activities and services on offer. This intervention can be crucial in ensuring young people succeed as they grow in to adulthood.”

The programme will provide for over 2,100 young people, who will have 4-6 sessions each with their link worker before being directly referred into local services. Each service will be open to all, but additional resources will be allocated to making it accessible to young people who experience social exclusion through poverty or protected characteristics.

The initiative follows the launch of the Government’s Loneliness Strategy in October, which noted the value of social prescribing. In a recent speech to The King’s Fund about the benefits of social prescribing, Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, Matt Hancock MP, said he saw social prescribing as “becoming an indispensable tool”, adding, “social prescription is about making better use of what we already have – making the arts and social activities more accessible”.

Cat Pritchard, Brighton & Hove CYP Wellbeing Services Manager, said on the news: “We’re delighted YMCA DownsLink Group is one of the organisations awarded a proportion of this funding. We will be setting up a social prescribing scheme within our Brighton & Hove Children & Young People’s (CYP) Wellbeing Service. This service works with young people aged 4-25, offering a range of innovative mental health interventions and is a local collaboration with YMCA DownsLink Group, Sussex Partnership Foundation Trust, Mind in Brighton and Hove and HERE. This funding gives us the opportunity to improve the transition between services for children and young people locally. We are excited about the positive impact this new link worker role could have on the lives of children, young people and families in Brighton and Hove.”

Dr Christa Beesley, a GP for Wellsbourne Healthcare CIC in Brighton and Hove, added: “I am delighted to have the support in social prescribing now being offered in Brighton. The gap between what is needed for young people experiencing mental health difficulties and what is available is huge, and waiting times for specialist therapy are very high. Social prescribing helps us to fill this gap and to get the whole community involved in supporting our children and young people.”

Sports and music have long been associated with supporting people through conditions including diabetes, dementia, loneliness, anxiety and depression. Activities offered under social prescribing are varied, and are already having a great impact on the lives of the UK’s young people. Jenny, a participant of the programme led by Sheffield Futures, said of the initiative: “The social prescribing programme has really opened my eyes to see what is available for me in Sheffield. I’ve been writing music since I was nine and now my Health and Wellbeing Worker has helped me to access studio time through the programme, which is mind-blowing! I recently moved to Sheffield and this service has helped me to gain confidence, it’s helped with my mental health and taught me to be more open-minded. I’ve been looking into song-writing with a community group, and social prescribing has shown me that there are so many opportunities out there.”

Feeling lonely or isolated? Suffering from low mood or lack of confidence? Or need help accessing services, jobs or education?

Sadie White No Comments

At Sheffield Futures we now run a social prescribing service for young people aged 13-25. Much like going to the GP for a prescription if you’re physically ill, we can work with you to prescribe activities and practical support that can help with a range of issues you may be facing such as loneliness and isolation, practical support accessing housing, education or employment or help with tackling low confidence, mood and wellbeing.

Find out more about social prescribing and how it can help you here.

SCR Mayor Dan Jarvis officially opens Sheffield Futures Health Zone for young people

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Sheffield’s largest youth charity, Sheffield Futures officially launched their new Health Zone for young people to access all of their health and wellbeing needs, with Sheffield City Region Mayor Dan Jarvis.

The Health Zone space has been transformed thanks to funding from the Department of Health’s Places of Safety capital grant and sits within Sheffield Futures emotional wellbeing service for young people aged 13 – 25: Door 43.

The Health Zone was launched by Sheffield City Region Mayor Dan Jarvis who said: ‘The young people who spoke today have given an incredible testimony to the service. It’s a tough world and it’s a tough time to be growing up and the pressures that young people face are much more acute than the pressures that my generation faced. As a result of that, many young people require support and help which is nothing to be ashamed about, all of us, at some point in our lives will need a bit of help.

‘That is why the work that is done here, by Sheffield Futures is incredibly important work.’

During an opening speech, Sheffield Futures Head of Targeted Services and Health, Dan White, spoke of the lengthy consultations with young people, mental health groups, healthcare professionals, Sheffield Hallam Architecture students and more to ensure that the Health Zone will meet the needs of young people. Feedback included the need for rooms for private conversations, as well as larger rooms for activities, a kitchen, a certified health room and modern soft furnishings, all of which feature in the new space.

The attendees were also joined by young people who have been supported by Door 43: Sam, Phoebe, James and Tara who spoke to their Health and Wellbeing Worker Sadie Charlton about where they were before the service, what work has been done with them and where they want to be in the future. Tara said: ‘Since I started coming here, I feel like I have meaning in my life.’

Sam said: ‘Before I came to Door 43, I had given up on life. I had given up on my hopes and dreams for the future. I stopped leaving the house and socialising, it took a lot to get me to come here. Door 43’s Wellbeing Café is a good opportunity to speak to like-minded people. Since coming to Door 43 I’ve realised that I can actually do the things that I want to do. The staff encouraged me to start working towards becoming a paramedic, they’ve encouraged me to start college again and do what I want to do. I would never have done it if it wasn’t for Door 43.’

The official opening of the Health Zone had an emotional high, with a performance from a young person who is supported by Door 43, Jenny. Unfortunately, Jenny lost her job due to her emotional wellbeing, and to pay rent, she sold her beloved guitar and keyboard. After Sheffield Futures posted Jenny’s story on social media, they were kindly donated a guitar and keyboard to give to her. Jenny has been writing songs about her mental health journey and performed at the event.

Door 43 aims to prevent young people from requiring expensive statutory, crisis led, interventions through offering unique combination of early intervention and prevention work, including counselling and other psychological therapies, awareness and advice work, health clinics, signposting and supported referral pathways, and personal support.

Many of the young people the service supports just need a safe space in which they can talk about how they feel in a comfortable environment. The Health Zone will be used flexibly to meet the varying needs of young people, taking a holistic view of emotional wellbeing and delivering early intervention and prevention work to release pressure on acute services.

Social prescribing for young people

Sadie White No Comments

Sheffield Futures are proud to launch a ‘social prescribing’ model for 13-25 year olds who require support to improve their mental health and emotional wellbeing, through access to a range of activities, tailored to their needs.

Socially prescribed activities will be entirely bespoke to the young person but may include funding to attend sports clubs or classes, leisure activities such as music and theatre groups, alternative therapies, gym membership and more for a 12-week period. 13-25 year olds will also receive support to access a range of existing provision, activities and services including arts groups, wellbeing groups, outdoors or nature groups and more.

With the overall wellbeing of young people aged 16-25 years old widely acknowledged to be decreasing and with emotional health seeing the biggest drop in 2018 (Youth Mental Health Index 2018), the need for preventative mental health services has never been more acute. The new social prescribing model has been launched in response to this and will be lead by Sheffield Futures emotional wellbeing service, Door 43.

Door 43 integrates a range of health and wellbeing support under one roof, giving young people the flexibility they need in terms of access to different specialist support services such as counselling and other psychological therapies, awareness and advice work, health clinics, signposting and mechanisms for referral for those who require specialist mental health assessment.

Gail Gibbons, Sheffield Futures Chief Executive said: ‘As we progress further down the track as a society towards a mental health crisis, there has never been a more pressing need for us to holistically address the emotional health and wellbeing needs of our young people.’

‘Sheffield Futures is proud to say that young people are at the heart of all we do, and our services change to meet their needs. The social prescribing model allows us to address many of the root causes for low-level mental health issues and encourage positive activities.’

Funding for the young people’s social prescribing scheme has been provided by the Department of Health and Social Care’s Health and Wellbeing Fund and is being co-ordinated by Streetgames UK and Youth Access, across four UK locations. In Sheffield the programme is being delivered by youth charity, Sheffield Futures.

Care Minister Caroline Dinenage said: ‘The voluntary and community sector has such a vital role to play in working with our health system to provide the kind of support that you can’t receive at your local GP surgery or hospital.’

Dinenage continues: ‘This new funding will mean that many more people receive support that looks at their needs holistically, enabling them to live happier, more independent lives. I look forward to seeing these projects put their plans into action and provide support to hundreds of thousands more people.’

The support will aim to deliver improvement in the health and quality of life through increased levels of activity, enabling community participation, breaking down barriers to accessing transport and benefits, encouraging healthy living and increasing engagement with school, college, training programmes and employment.

Youth Work Week 2018: Kirsty Roy

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It’s Youth Work Week this week and we’re talking to youth workers from across the organisation as part of our #youthworkmatters campaign to celebrate the varied ways our youth workers help young people from across the city.

Here we talk to Kirsty Roy a youth worker in our Door 43 emotional health and wellbeing service.

Kirsty Roy, youth worker – Door 43

What does your role as a youth worker involve?

It involves working with lots of different young people from all across the city to help them address emotional, practical and other  emotional health and wellbeing needs. I use my skills to relate to young people from all walks of life experiencing diverse problems, including problems that start in the home such as poverty, to problems in school whether it’s achievement or stress, to problems with low mood and depression.

How do you help Door 43 deliver for young people?

I help Door 43 deliver positive results for young people for example by giving them the tools and advice to help them get themselves into a better place emotionally which then sets them up to be able to deal with the challenges they face. It’s not about telling them what to do but it’s about coaching them and giving them the tools for example, coping strategies and building the resilience to cope with life’s set backs. Ultimately, I help them to uncover the answers and the right way forward for themselves.

What do you think are the challenges for young people?

I could go on forever. I think today’s young people have real challenges. From the current issues we have with knife crime and gang culture to dealing with the pressure of school without becoming stressed and anxious to problems at home such as poverty and peer on peer pressure. The list goes on. Young people are expected to deal with all of this when they’re young and inexperienced and don’t have the life experience and resilience to deal with it. It’s a really tough call.

How important is youth work to young people?

Very important. Absolutely essential. Without youth workers or youth clubs or anyone positive in a young persons life I can say I feel very sure that as well as the obvious detrimental effect and suffering for young people, the negative impact on our communities will be great. What I like about youth work is that it’s an early intervention for young people and it’s about giving them the information and tools to make positive choices. It gives them a positive influence which for some young people is unfortunately completely absent from their lives. We don’t tell them what to do we just advise them. The cut backs show that crime rates are going through the roof. I fear for what would happen if funding for youth services is cut back any more.

You can find out more about Door 43 here

Door43 – Emotional, mental and sexual health support

How you can support us:

Find out more about how youth work transforms lives by following our #YouthWorkMatters campaign on Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn and Facebook.

You can also write your own message of support for @SheffFutures using the hashtag #YouthWorkMatters

Please visit www.sheffieldfutures.org.uk to find out more about what we do and how you can support us with fundraising, volunteering or as an ambassador.

 

Youth Work Matters exhibition Mon 29th Oct – Fri 2nd Nov, Winter Gardens

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Sheffield’s largest youth charity, Sheffield Futures, are celebrating youth work and its fantastic achievements for young people and communities. Since 2010, funding to vital youth services has been cut, with 600+ youth centres closed nationally. In Sheffield, we are pleased to say that youth services are still funded by Sheffield City Council, although delivery is reduced annually.

To celebrate and demonstrate the value of youth work, Sheffield Futures has developed Youth Work Matters. Youth Work Matters is an exhibition to showcase why youth work is so important to the communities in our city. Featuring young people from across the city, these photographs tell the story of why youth work matters and needs continued support for the benefit of all Sheffield’s communities.

For this project, we visited nine of the youth clubs that Sheffield Futures run each week across the city, including one club for young with learning disabilities; we spent time at the Wellbeing Cafe for young people with emotional wellbeing issues and spoke to Sheffield Young Advisors and Sheffield Youth Cabinet, to see why youth work is important to them.

 


How you can support us:

Find out more about how youth work transforms lives by following our #YouthWorkMatters campaign on Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn and Facebook.

You can also write your own message of support for @SheffFutures using the hashtag #YouthWorkMatters

Please visit www.sheffieldfutures.org.uk to find out more about what we do and how you can support us with fundraising, volunteering or as an ambassador.

How you can help

Our charity is dedicated to helping Sheffield's young people to reach their full potential and achieve the best out of life, whatever their starting point. To help us to do more to support young people and communities we need your help. Just remember, every penny you donate will make a difference.