Door43

Wellbeing tips from Christos: Healthy body = healthy mind and workout video

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More ideas for fitness from Christos here:

 

Door 43 wellbeing worker Christos has taken over the Door 43 Insta channel today and is focused on the importance of exercise within the daily routine for young people. Exercise is so important to keep bodies and minds healthy. Healthy body = healthy mind.  Give Christos’s workout a go too and let us know your thoughts!

Wellbeing tips from Terri: How to be more present, increase self awareness and reduce anxiety

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Sheffield Futures wellbeing worker Terri has some great tips to share on how to increase self awareness and be in the present moment to help drive down feelings of anxiety and stress.

Listen to the birds in the background, just allowing yourself to focus on the birds tweeting is calming, makes you want to get out in nature and be in the moment – at a 2m distance from everyone else though of course!

Door 43 wellbeing blog: Self isolation, social media rumours and the need for rational thinking

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Over the coming weeks, due to the need to shut our face to face services as a result of Coronavirus, we’ll be keeping in touch with young people that use our Door 43 services online. This is the first of our weekly blogs. In these blogs our Door 43 team will impart wise words, wisdom and tools to help young people manage emotional health and wellbeing during this difficult time. Be sure to look out for these blogs on the Sheffield Futures website and social media channels. 

In this first blog, Luca Jandu our wellbeing worker talks about the need for rational thinking. Self isolation, although necessary right now in terms of physical health, can present some challenges for our emotional health. As our minds wander and we can’t forward plan, with the situation changing daily, we’re prone to catastrophising and this can cause unhelpful anxieties to manifest.  Here, Luca acknowledges this, talks about his own experience and provides some helpful ways to challenge irrational and anxious thoughts. 

 

 

So, this is the first blog from me, in this funny time we are facing! I really hope – considering the circumstances – you are all keeping as well as you can be. It’s uncharted territory for all of us, pushing us all hard emotionally, so it’s never been more important to be mindful of our wellbeing. On this note, I thought it would be worth looking at the need for rational thinking and the importance of trying to find a way to stay calm and keep going – especially hard when we are facing so many new challenges.

I had my own moment of irrational thought and mild panic last week and wanted to tell you about it as there were definitely a few learnings. I’ve been self-isolating since the 18th, so have been on social media a lot more than I usually would. As we know, social media isn’t the most reliable source of information. On the 18th, some rumours started circulating of a military crackdown, which even though I fact checked and found some of the sources to be from a fake website, the constant references to ‘military crackdown’ eventually got the better of me. So,  I rang my housemates to ask them to buy a load of rice, lentils and a crate of chickpeas and tahini – for hummus, I would really struggle without hummus! In hindsight this may have been a little irrational.

 

 

Later that evening – when looking at more reliable sources – I discovered the military had been brought in to support the police. It seems that a few police must be self-isolating or looking after their kids and the military are just doing a bit of their work – the mass of rice, lentils, crate of chick peas and litre of tahini all seems a bit silly now – whoops.

Now ‘rational me’ knows that I’m not going to starve, that the supermarkets will continue to stock the shelves and that the military play an essential role in protecting the public and can provide useful public services in times like these, getting food to isolated vulnerable people for example, which is very important. I usually have a pretty good grip on the irrational me and control my impulses, but I guess times like this can challenge our rational selves, push us all to do irrational things and social media can act as fuel in this fire. This incident emphasised to me the need to fact check what I read on social media with reliable sources, and to be a bit more conscious and mindful of my thoughts to try to keep a better grip on my irrational self.

After I told the team at Door 43 about this we posted some links to more reliable sources of information on our social media channels alongside some alternative positive news stories. I’ve put these links below for you at the bottom of my blog. We ask you in these difficult times to try to choose your sources of information carefully and look for the links we post too. While this is a difficult time with some challenges that will be new to all of us, we need to be cautious of where our information is coming from, fact check, use reputable sources for news and think rationally.

I’ve pulled together questions to ask yourselves that may help to challenge irrational thoughts as they arise. Maybe I wouldn’t be sat among this mass of rice, lentils if i’d considered these for a moment!

Questions to ask yourself when challenging irrational or anxious thoughts.

  1. Is there any evidence that contradicts my worry? Can I trust the source of my worry? Do I have all the information? Am I ignoring any contrary facts? Are my sources reputable and trustworthy?
  2. Am I assuming the worst will happen? Ask yourself – ‘Have I jumped to the worst- case scenario? How likely is this to happen really?
  3. Am I jumping to conclusions? Ask yourself – do you have the facts to back up your thoughts? Are they based in reality?
  4. What are the costs and benefits of thinking in this way? Is this a positive / healthy way of thinking? What would a healthier more balanced thought look like?
  5. Am I ignoring positive information? Is the negative looming unnecessarily large?
  6. How will I feel about this in 6 months? In a year? Look to the future, putting a situation into another point in time can give you a valuable, calming perspective.
  7. Is there another way of looking at this situation? Can you think of positives? For example, yes you might be stuck inside and you can’t see your friends but on the flip side it won’t be for ever and taking this action now will mean we can all get back to normal more quickly and safeguard the most vulnerable people.

Hopefully going through these questions when irrational or anxious thoughts get the better of you will help you slow your mind down so you can check yourself for catastrophising, unhelpful thinking and gain some perspective.

I wish you all the best in this challenging time and remember that Door 43 – even in if in a virtual form – is still here to support you. Keep an eye on our website and social media for more information about this. We’re working hard to get things up and running.

Take care of yourselves and each other and watch this space for our next blog next Wednesday.

Luca

Information on the importance of looking after yourself:

https://bit.ly/33GNSu4

https://bit.ly/2Usalac

https://bit.ly/3dnJTXV

Reliable information sources:
https://www.gov.uk/coronavirus

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/

Positive news:
https://www.facebook.com/thehappybroadcast/

https://bit.ly/33MD3ac

 

Door 43 Wellbeing Wednesday

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Some good news in these difficult times folks! As of today, the Door 43 Wellbeing Wednesday service will be available for all young people currently registered with Door 43 over the phone. Young people registered with Door 43 can speak to one of our wellbeing workers between 11-1pm or 2-4pm.

Young people that want to speak to a wellbeing worker should call or text 07815698447. Your request will then be allocated and you’ll be contacted.

Scroll the pics in the Insta story for full details from the team.

For young people not registered but in need of help, we’re working really hard to replicate our services online so watch this space for more information.

Youth Work Week 2019 blog: Experiencing positive health and wellbeing

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Aaron Daniels is a Youth Work Team Leader at Sheffield Futures. As part of Aaron’s role, he delivers Youth Sheffield in the West of the city. Youth Sheffield is Sheffield’s city wide youth service. Youth Sheffield provides safe spaces where young people can feel comfortable and confident and take part in enriching activities, keeping them safe and supported to make the most of their lives. For today’s #YWW19 theme, Aaron talks about how Sheffield Futures works to ensure young people in Sheffield experience positive health and wellbeing.

Health and wellbeing issues are on the rise nationally and the issues are well documented, with issues and struggles such as anxiety, depression, low self-esteem and social isolation a common complaint for our young people.

A good way to think about our youth clubs is that they are a gateway for support. Youth clubs provide a platform for young people to engage in activities that have a positive effect on their health and well-being. Young people engage in a variety of activities that cover curriculum themes that include sports, arts and media and life skills. Youth workers frequently consult with young people to ensure that their needs are being met and their ideas are being valued. The stimulating and interactive nature of these activities encourages young people to socialise with others and strengthen their friendship groups.  Throughout the youth work process of relationship and trust building young people often feel able to speak about concerns or issues that are affecting their well-being.

A youth club offers a safe and confidential place for young people to talk, a fun and interactive environment where young people can make new friends and we provide opportunities for young people to take part in half term activities such as travelling outside of the city, meeting new people and exploring future aspirations.  Youth workers are able to listen to concerns around well-being and if appropriate signpost or make referrals to more specialist areas of support.

If we cannot offer the right support directly in our clubs and we identify a need, we enable young people to access the specialist support we have on offer at Sheffield Futures and through our network of partners for example, help with substance mis-use, sexual health, one to one support to get young people back on track, support to give young people a voice and emotional and wellbeing support through our Door 43 service.

If you or a young person you know is experiencing any of the issues mentioned here and would benefit from support please reach out to Sheffield Futures. Tel 0114 2012800 or [email protected]

Find out more about your community youth club here https://www.sheffieldfutures.org.uk/things-to-do/

Sheffield author A F Stone pledges support for Sheffield Futures

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Sheffield author A F Stone has caused a bit of a buzz lately with the publication of her book The Raven Wheel – a gritty tale of the journey of three teenagers in Stoke on Trent where Amy grew up before moving to Sheffield fifteen years ago. Amy has also created a bit of a buzz here at our Door 43 emotional health and wellbeing service as she’s kindly offered to donate 80 per cent of all proceeds of her book sold through The Porter Book Shop to Door 43, here at Sheffield Futures.

The Raven Wheel deals with some dark and realistic themes including mental illness, suicide, drug abuse and difficult relationships as it tracks the young lives of the three main characters. Talking about why Amy chose to pledge her support to Sheffield Futures she said, ‘I chose Sheffield Futures and specifically the Door 43 service because I was looking for a local charity that provides the kind of support needed for the issues raised in my book.’

‘The three main characters are affected by a lot of things including mental health problems, social isolation, sexual abuse, family breakdown and bullying and Sheffield Futures offers a great holistic approach that would help young people facing issues like that.’

Commenting on the support Gail Gibbons CEO at Sheffield Futures said, ‘It’s clearly brilliant that Amy has decided to donate proceeds from the sale of The Raven Wheel to help young people that access our Door 43 service and that the book shines a light on the reality of some young people’s lives and the help that’s needed. We want all young people that might be experiencing emotional health and wellbeing issues caused by any of the themes raised in the book to know that support is out there for them. We wish Amy all the best for the future and for the success of The Raven Wheel.’

Here at our Door 43 emotional health and wellbeing centre at Star House we offer a preventative service focussed on intervening early with young people, to open up conversations and hopefully stop more serious issues in their tracks.

We know that young people can be put off accessing mental health services as they associate these environments with the stress and anxiety that is often fuelling their issues. Our Door 43 service ensures we can offer a safe and welcoming space for young people to openly talk about their feelings and access early preventative support in a completely neutral environment where they can literally get away from it all, clear their head and become ready to access the support they need.

Door 43 integrates a range of health and wellbeing support under one roof, giving young people the flexibility they need in terms of access to different specialist support services such as counselling and other psychological therapies, awareness and advice work, health clinics, signposting and mechanisms for referral for those who require specialist mental health assessment. We also offer social prescribing for young people. Much like going to the GP for a prescription, where we deem appropriate, we can prescribe therapeutic activities that young people show an interest in.

Young people can drop in to the Door 43 wellbeing café at Star House on Division Street on a Tuesday between 5-7pm or on Wellbeing Wednesday 11-4pm and on a Saturday 9.30-1pm. Our wellbeing workers can assess a young person’s level of need and provide appropriate support or refer young people on to more appropriate services through our referral network. Call 0114 201 800 or [email protected] 

 

World Mental Health Day 2019: A short conversation can really make the difference

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It’s World Mental Health Day today and this year the World Federation for Mental Health has chosen the theme of suicide prevention.

At our emotional health and wellbeing centre Door 43, our service is focussed on early intervention and is a preventative mental health service for 13-25 year olds that aims to stop mental health conditions in their tracks before they turn into more serious issues. It’s one of only a few of its kind in the country and since its inception the service has been very much in demand with the majority self-referring with issues such as stress, anxiety and low mood often caused by the overwhelming demands that modern life places on today’s young people.

Dan White, Head of Targeted Services and Health said, ‘It’s a good time to remind ourselves this World Mental Health Day that just a small conversation with someone can make a huge difference to a young person’s state of mind.’

‘Here at our Door 43 emotional health and wellbeing centre at Star House we offer a preventative service focussed on intervening early with young people, to open up conversations and hopefully stop more serious issues in their tracks.’

‘We know that young people can be put off accessing mental health services as they associate these environments with the stress and anxiety that is often fuelling their issues. Our Door 43 service ensures we can offer a safe and welcoming space for young people to openly talk about their feelings and access early preventative support in a completely neutral environment where they can literally get away from it all, clear their head and become ready to access the support they need.’

‘Door 43 integrates a range of health and wellbeing support under one roof, giving young people the flexibility they need in terms of access to different specialist support services such as counselling and other psychological therapies, awareness and advice work, health clinics, signposting and mechanisms for referral for those who require specialist mental health assessment. We also offer social prescribing for young people. Much like going to the GP for a prescription, where we deem appropriate, we can prescribe therapeutic activities that young people show an interest in. ’

‘We have seen very encouraging results from Door 43 so far and it’s really heartening to see the positive impact we’re having on the mental health and emotional wellbeing of Sheffield’s young people.’

When talking about how the Door 43 service has helped him, Darren Jenks a young person who has accessed Door 43 in the past said,’Door43 is a place I can go and offload about what has happened in my week. I don’t feel judged by the staff; they are all so easy to talk to. I feel like having that space every week makes a massive difference to my mood.’

‘When I’ve got loads of stuff going on in my head, I can come in to see someone at Door43 and they help me to make sense of it all and we can make a plan together and I feel so much better.’

Young people can drop in to the Door 43 wellbeing café at Star House on Division Street on a Tuesday between 5-7pm or on Wellbeing Wednesday 11-4pm and on a Saturday 9.30-1pm. Our wellbeing workers can assess a young person’s level of need and provide appropriate support or refer young people on to more appropriate services through our referral network. Call 0114 201 800 or [email protected] 

Joe Carnall of Milburn fame talking to a young person at the Door 43 wellbeing café

Milburn frontman Joe Carnall lends his support to young people’s emotional health & wellbeing service Door 43

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Joe Carnall of Milburn fame has pledged his support as an ambassador for Door 43 – Sheffield Futures’ emotional health and wellbeing service for young people.

Surprising the young people at a special Tramlines themed wellbeing café at the bespoke wellbeing zone at Sheffield Futures on Division Street, Joe popped in to add some star quality to the evening. ‘It was so fantastic when Joe turned up, I couldn’t believe it. I’m a massive fan’ said Anna Jones, Wellbeing café attendee and volunteer.

‘It’s likely we all know someone who has had problems with mental health and I think it’s really important to help young people and give them the tools to get them through dark times.’ Says Joe.

‘That’s why I’m supporting Door 43, so more young people can access the service, hang out with mates and have fun in a safe space at the wellbeing cafes but importantly they can access support on their own terms, if and when they need it.’ He continues.

 

 

Door43 offers Sheffield’s 13 – 25 year olds support on a range of social, emotional, practical and health related issues and runs a weekly wellbeing café on Tuesday’s 5-7pm at Star House, Division Street.

Door43 at Sheffield Futures on Division Street is staffed by youth workers, counsellors, substance misuse workers, sexual health workers, careers advisors, volunteers as well as peer supporters.

Young people can drop in at Door43, Sheffield Futures, Division Street, Wednesday 11-4pm or at the wellbeing café on Tuesdays 5-7pm. For other times please call 0114 201 2800.

Find out more about the activities and workshops on offer on the Sheffield Futures website www.sheffieldfutures.org.uk/i-need-help/door43/

Social prescribing

Door 43 also runs a social prescribing service for young people aged 13-25. Much like going to the GP for a prescription if you’re physically ill, Door 43 will prescribe activities, services and practical support that can help with a range of issues such as loneliness and isolation, difficultly accessing housing, education and employment and low confidence, mood and wellbeing.

If you know a young person or young people that you feel may benefit from the service you can refer them to the service by calling 0114 201 2774.

You can find out more about becoming an ambassador here 

Celebrating PRIDE month 2019

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Pride 2019: Showing our support for LGBTQ people in our communities and across the world #Pride2019

June marks the start of a summer of Pride events in Sheffield and across the world where throughout the summer people will be coming together in celebration, protest, unity and solidarity for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) Pride Month.

The Stonewall riots, also referred to as the Stonewall uprising or the Stonewall rebellion,  were a series of spontaneous, violent demonstrations by members of the gay (LGBT) community against a police raid that took place in the early morning hours of June 28, 1969, at the Stonewall Inn in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. They are widely considered to constitute the most important event leading to the gay liberation movement and the modern fight for LGBT rights in the United States.

Pride Month is so important because it marks the start of huge change within the LGBT community. Although attitudes and injustice still remain, we have come a long way since the riots of 1969 and by continuing in this long standing tradition we continue to raise awareness, improve the attitudes of society and encourage inclusiveness.

Pride in Sheffield

Pride in Sheffield is coming to Endcliffe Park on 27th July. Pride in Sheffield aims to strive to make Sheffield a safe city for all LGBTQ+ people every day, not just the day of Pride. Pride in Sheffield is a new Pride committee elected by the community to deliver Pride in 2019.

About Door 43

Door43 offers Sheffield’s 13 – 25 year olds support on a range of social, emotional, practical and health related issues.

Door43 at Sheffield Futures on Division Street is staffed by youth workers, counsellors, substance misuse workers, sexual health workers, careers advisors, volunteers as well as peer supporters.

Young people can drop in at Door43, Sheffield Futures, Division Street, Wednesday 11-4pm. For other times please call 0114 201 2800.

You can find out more about the activities and workshops on offer on the Sheffield Futures website www.sheffieldfutures.org.uk/i-need-help/door43/

We also run a social prescribing service for young people aged 13-25. Much like going to the GP for a prescription if you’re physically ill, we can work with you to prescribe activities, services and practical support that can help with a range of issues you may be facing such as:

  • Loneliness and isolation: We can help you to make new friends or find groups to make connections with others through activities you’re interested in
  • Difficulty accessing housing, education or employment: We can provide practical support to make housing applications, coach you to understand opportunities for further education or with getting back into work
  • Low confidence, mood, wellbeing: We can support you to find ways to build confidence, improve mood and boost wellbeing and tackle any underlying issues you may have

If you know a young person or young people that you feel may benefit from the service you can refer them to the service by calling 0114 201 2774.

To celebrate and show support and solidarity for #Pride2019 as well as raise much needed funds for our Door 43 service you can purchase our rainbow charity wristbands here.

Support Sheffield’s young people by running the Sheffield 10k in September

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Sheffield Futures are looking for fundraisers to run the Asda Foundation Sheffield 10k in September to help the charity to sustain and expand Door 43, enabling more young people across the city to reach the support that they need. Door 43 supports local 13 – 25 year olds with their mental health by offering a weekly drop-in, one-to-one sessions and a social prescribing service – aiming to get young people into social activities as a way to manage their emotional wellbeing.

This spring, the charity had their first runner in the London Marathon, with Irina Inayat raising a fantastic £653 for Sheffield Futures. Irina hopes that her run will inspire others to get their running shoes on in support of Sheffield Futures.

As an official charity partner for the Asda Foundation Sheffield 10K, Sheffield Futures has places to offer in the event taking place on Sunday 22nd September 2019 and the charity are encouraging runners to book their places and begin training now.

Georgia Featherstone, Charity & Partnerships Executive at Event Organisers, Run For All, said: ‘We’re absolutely delighted to have Sheffield Futures on board as an official partner charity for both the Sheffield Half Marathon and the Sheffield 10K. The atmosphere in Sheffield is always excellent and it’s inspiring to see so many runners of all abilities turning out to support so many deserving causes.’

The Sheffield 10k is a fantastic route, taking the runners from the crowds and atmosphere of the city centre, up the vibrant Ecclesall Road, around Endcliffe Park, ending on Arundel Gate.

Runners who sign up to run the Sheffield 10k for Sheffield Futures will receive a running t-shirt, water bottle and sports bag – as well as their places funded, with a minimum fundraising amount to reach. To sign up, please contact: Mark Cummins at [email protected] or call 0114 201 2841

Sheffield runners have been out in force, raising funds for local youth charity Sheffield Futures’ emotional wellbeing service Door 43.

Runners have tackled the city’s hills in the Asda Foundation Sheffield Half Marathon. Runner Natasha Bright said: ‘I wanted to raise funds for Door 43; it’s a vital service that could support many more young people.’

She continues: ‘I’d never run a half marathon before so I thought I’d start with the one on my doorstep. It was a brilliant experience with some fantastic views as you get out towards the Peak District and the crowd really carries you!’

About Door 43

Door43 offers Sheffield’s 13 – 25 year olds support on a range of social, emotional, practical and health related issues.

Door43 at Sheffield Futures on Division Street is staffed by youth workers, counsellors, substance misuse workers, sexual health workers, careers advisors, volunteers as well as peer supporters.

Young people can drop in at Door43, Sheffield Futures, Division Street on Wednesdays. Please call 0114 201 2800 for further information and appointments.

You can find out more about the activities and workshops on offer on the Sheffield Futures website www.sheffieldfutures.org.uk/i-need-help/door43/

We also run a social prescribing service for young people aged 13-25. Much like going to the GP for a prescription if you’re physically ill, we can work with you to prescribe activities, services and practical support that can help with a range of issues you may be facing such as:

  • Loneliness and isolation: We can help you to make new friends or find groups to make connections with others through activities you’re interested in
  • Difficulty accessing housing, education or employment: We can provide practical support to make housing applications, coach you to understand opportunities for further education or with getting back into work
  • Low confidence, mood, wellbeing: We can support you to find ways to build confidence, improve mood and boost wellbeing and tackle any underlying issues you may have.

For those that would rather, there is also the option to book appointments.

If you know a young person or young people that you feel may benefit from the service you can refer them to the service by calling 0114 201 2774.

How you can help

Our charity is dedicated to helping Sheffield's young people to reach their full potential and achieve the best out of life, whatever their starting point. To help us to do more to support young people and communities we need your help. Just remember, every penny you donate will make a difference.