Health

Door43 Information for Professionals Sessions

Tash Bright No Comments

Door43 is a new Youth Information, Advice & Counselling Service (YIACS) based at Sheffield Futures. We offer holistic emotional wellbeing support for young people aged 13-25 in Sheffield.

Come and meet the team, see the service, and find out more about what Door43 has to offer!

Join us for an informal information session on how we support young people, and how to make referrals or support young people to access our service. Find out more about the service before you visit.

Book on to one of the following dates via Eventbrite:

Thursday 30th November, 10.30-11.30 at Sheffield Futures, Star House, 43 Division St, S1 4GE

Thursday 15th February 2018, 10.30-11.30 at Sheffield Futures, Star House, 43 Division St, S1 4GE

Thursday 17th May 2018,  10.30-11.30 at Sheffield Futures, Star House, 43 Division St, S1 4GE

Fun Palace – THIS SATURDAY!

Tash Bright No Comments

The Door43 are running a Fun Palace this Saturday at Sheffield Futures, Star House, 43 Division Street, S1 4GE. Our theme is sex and sexual health!

Saturday 7th October 10.30-12.30

Join us for: cake decorating, arts and crafts, card games and more to informally learn about sex, sexual health & porn, in a fun and young person friendly environment. It is FREE! Come along and take the taboo out of talking about sex!

We will have a health and wellbeing worker available on the day for one-to-one screening, information and advice. Find out more about our event or book your place here

The Fun Palace is a national event, encouraging people to learn but also have fun at the same time.

We advise that anyone attending is over the age of 13.

Our new Wellbeing Cafe!

Tash Bright No Comments

Door43 welcomes you to the

WELLBEING CAFE

Every Tuesday, 5pm – 7pm

at Sheffield Futures, Star House, 43 Division St, S1 4GE.

Are you a young person aged between 13 and 25? Come and join us for games, arts and crafts, film nights and much more!

…or if that’s not your thing, simply drop in for a chat over a brew and biscuits.


For more information, email: door43@sheffieldfutures.org.uk or call: 0114 201 2774

Follow us on Instagram for daily updates!

Young people joined Paul Blomfield MP for a Big Conversation

Tash Bright No Comments

Members of Sheffield’s Youth Cabinet and UK Youth Parliament joined young people at Sheffield Futures for a Big Conversation with Paul Blomfield MP. The Big Conversation is an annual community consultation with a variety of audiences.

On 20th September, the Big Conversation came to Sheffield Futures on Division Street for a special event for young people. Youth Councillor for East Sheffield, Fozia Sultana, chaired the event, helping young people to form and ask questions about the issues that matter to them.

The conversation tackled big issues such as ‘making the invisible, visible’. This is one of the issues on the current youth consultation Make Your Mark, aimed at helping invisible illnesses be more recognisable, through better education. Fozia Sultana said: “There should be more opportunities for support when people are suffering with illnesses which are physically invisible.”

The groups spoke about issues facing young carers, many of whom do not realise that they are carers. One young person said: “there should be more support from the Government for young carers, both emotional and physical support. One practical way that young carers could be helped is with free or heavily discounted travel passes, this would be one less thing for young carers to think about.”

 One young person said: “We need a more diverse curriculum. Schools needs to include LGBT+ in sex education lessons, and to have a focus on emotional relationships, not just physical.”

 The conversation also focussed on mental health, with one young person describing their experiences of mental health services. They said: “In the past I gave up trying to access mental health services because there isn’t enough provision for everyone who needs it. There also needs to be a way for young people to access support at earlier stages, rather than when they’re at crisis point.”

Paul Blomfield MP listened to the young people, and said: “I have been given a completely new insight about young people’s mental health which I have never understood before and this has been very useful.”

After calling the event very interesting, Paul concluded: “A common theme in the discussions has been changes to the curriculum to prepare young people for life. Schools are currently measured by success in exam league tables and we could help to instruct schools to include education about life skills young people need for their futures.”

 “Your voice is a very important part of setting my priorities. Thank you all for contributing and your time.”

World Suicide Prevention Day

Tash Bright No Comments

This post was written by Kate, Sue and Dave from the charity SToRMS.

SToRMS stands for Strategies To Reduce Male Suicide.

SToRMS is a small organisation based in Sheffield, South Yorkshire and set up in July 2015. It is a fund within the South Yorkshire Community Foundation, a registered charity. SToRMS was set up in memory of Dan McAllister who unexpectedly took his own life in May 2015 aged nineteen.


Recent ONS statistics showed that in 2016, 5,668 people died by suicide in Great Britain. This represents a fall from over 6,000 across the last 6 years, however there is still work to be done. Of these deaths, 24% were women and 76% were men.

As many of you will know, SToRMS was set up in July 2015, after we lost Dan McAllister to suicide. Over the two years since that day, we have heard from many other families and loved ones who have lost their son, daughter, or friend in the same way. Although each person has their own unique story, one thing is constant: every single death was preventable.

The societal shifts we need to see are not simple. It is not just a case of increased funding to ensure that access to mental health services is faster, or more effective. We also cannot just focus on suicide prevention training for medical professionals, university lecturers or other staff regularly dealing with “High Risk” groups. Moreover, anti-stigma campaigns will not make a difference without other changes. All of these things cannot happen in isolation. The problem is far bigger than that.

Today, we want to talk about something that our initiatives have not really covered thus far. This is the impact of a death by suicide on family and friends. This aspect of suicide prevention tends to go unacknowledged, but in fact the people immediately affected by suicide are at significant risk of taking their own lives themselves.

When someone you love dies it is devastating. When they die by suicide however, the emotions experienced by those left behind are intense, particularly as the way their loved one died is often traumatic, or sudden. Everyone deals with grief differently. After Dan died, as a family we all hurtled between anger, devastation, guilt and numbness. There were days when we couldn’t do anything but cry if we even tried to speak. So we stayed silent. Dan died away from us whilst at University. Some universities and emergency services provide support to families who have been bereaved by suicide. We cannot speak for others, but the support we received was provided by the incredible people at CRUSE Sheffield. Apart from that, we had each other.

The recent deaths of Chris Cornell and Chester Bennington sparked a social media frenzy, which ranged from messages of condolence, to diatribes about how someone could be so selfish. For the record, saying suicide is selfish completely misunderstands the mind-set of someone who is suicidal. It implies that this individual felt that they had other options, other than to take their own life. This is simply not true.

Across the world, 800,000 people die by suicide every year. The pain that the ones left behind feel is enduring. It changes people, it breaks up families, and it leaves you questioning what the point is. Then there is the stigma. From a personal perspective, we decided early on that we would choose to be open and honest about how Dan died wherever possible. We decided that the last twenty minutes of his life did not define him. But people are scared to talk about suicide. This is not malicious, but borne out of uncertainty. Talking about it is painful, yes. But not talking about it doesn’t make it go away. When someone you love dies by suicide, that knowledge is always there, in the back of your mind. In the early days, it is all consuming. It is the first thing you think about when you wake up. You think about it when you are paying for your shopping at the supermarket. Then, when you are trying to sleep, images flood into your mind. Sometimes it can be terrifying. As time goes on, that reality becomes more normal. For us, it hasn’t become less painful, however it does become less of a shock. But we never forget. When you lose a loved one to suicide, one of the most constant emotions you feel is confusion. Part of it is pure disbelief that someone you love could make that “decision”. We have slowly come to realise that what got us here was a chain of events, emotions, or actions that we will probably never truly understand. But that doesn’t stop you asking, “why?”

We set up SToRMS because we wanted to make changes within our community and in wider society which might have changed the outcome for Dan, and therefore might do the same for others. Dan had no diagnosed mental health problems, and although we knew he was stressed and occasionally unhappy, when we tried to encourage him to seek help beyond our family, he reassured us that he was okay. We believe therefore that if Dan had felt able to open up and tell us or anyone about how he was feeling, the outcome might have been different. Moreover, if we had asked the right questions and facilitated conversations, the same could be true. Often, we think that if someone is suicidal it will be obvious. Stereotypical representations of depression or anxiety encourage us to believe that if someone we knew was considering taking their own life, we would be able to recognise it, and intervene. For us, it wasn’t like that. With Dan, every statement of frustration, or self-deprecation was accompanied with a smile, or if we asked him what he meant, he would brush us off. But, with the benefit of hindsight, we are beginning to recognise the subtle signs that we missed.

This is why we place such emphasis on the community element of suicide prevention. We believe that everyone has a role to play. There is fantastic work currently being done by charities such as Papyrus, CALM, and If U Care Share. We are currently working on our contribution, which will centre on workshops which are for everyone. Inspired by the approach of MHFA training courses, our initiative, ‘Wise Talkers’, will aim to equip people with the skills to deal with difficult conversations, to be able to direct people towards further help and support if necessary, but perhaps most importantly, to practice self-care throughout this. We are excited to launch these initiatives in the coming year.

This year, the theme of World Suicide Prevention Day is:

Taking a minute can change a life.”

This core principle underwrites the work that we fund and provide across Sheffield. We believe that everyone has the capacity to offer support to someone experiencing suicidal thoughts. Here are some key things to remember:

  1. Ask the question directly: “Are you thinking about taking your own life?”. This will not make someone more likely to take their own life, in fact, it might reconnect them, and give them the opportunity to voice what they are feeling and experiencing.
  2. This is the most important thing you can do. Don’t try and jump in with answers, as this may cause them to shut down. Also, try to avoid saying that you understand. Often this comes from a good place, but the reality is that you can’t truly understand because you are not them. Instead, acknowledge and validate that what they are feeling or experiencing is difficult.
  3. Do not judge them. This is not just about avoiding saying something, but it’s also about your body language, and expression. Try and be as relaxed as possible, and don’t panic if they say something which concerns you. Respond calmly and clearly. You might also feel uncomfortable, but try not to let that show.
  4. Let them know that you are there. Making someone feel less alone is key to reducing the risk that they might take their own life. Also, don’t just say it, act on it. Text them to find out how they are, invite them to do things. Say that you are there to listen, but equally you can just be with them to watch a film, or get a takeaway. The small gestures really do make a massive difference.
  5. Look after yourself. Supporting someone who is experiencing suicidal thoughts can be exhausting, and you must make sure that you have support yourself. If you feel that it is becoming overwhelming, try and encourage them to seek other help. But, don’t assume that someone else will do a better job than you. Chances are, if that person has been able to talk to you, you will be able to help them in some way. They may value your opinion and support. Have confidence in your ability. Saying something wrong is far better than saying nothing at all.

In recognition of World Suicide Prevention Day, we ask you to act according to these principles. There might be someone in your life that you haven’t spoken to for a while, but keep meaning to contact. You might know someone who is having a hard time. Start those conversations today. You really could save a life.

Also, light a candle to remember Dan, and all those beautiful, brilliant people who we have lost to suicide. We can make a difference together.

Thank you for reading,

Kate, Sue and Dave.

https://iasp.info/wspd2017/

http://stormsdmc.org


For anyone who has been affected by this post, and would like to talk about it more, please visit our new wellbeing service, Door43. If you are looking for help, we are here to listen.

Mental Health Awareness Week #mhaw17 with Sheffield Young Advisors

Tash Bright No Comments

This Mental Health Awareness Week, we asked young people what made good mental health practitioners.

This is what they said:

You can find more of our videos on YouTube. Just search for ‘Sheffield Futures’

 

On Monday, at our Festival of Debate event #MakeYourMark young people told us that they believe “mental health needs to be taken more seriously.” 

“I have severe anxiety and I struggle to speak to people. I keep myself to myself and let all my frustration out when I get home. I wish that people knew I was suffering, that would help me to open up.”

It was discussed that young people would like to speak about mental health in schools: “I think that Mental Health Awareness should be taught in schools, perhaps through role-playing exercises at least once a term so that people know about it and know how to help others.”

The group believed that: “There needs to be more support for young people and a place to go if you’re stressed about exams.”

Some young people felt thatMental health services are stretched to capacity.”

One young person said: “Everyone should be treated the same, including people with mental illness – they should be told off when they say something mean and doing mean things.”

It was felt that there is not enough awareness in schools and that “Mental illness should be as important or visible as physical illness. If someone’s off for a broken arm, when they come back people are loving, if you’re off with mental health problems then people don’t know how to act around you.” 

Young people launch city’s suicide prevention pathway

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“I always had suicidal feelings as I grew up. I never got any support to help me cope with these and ended up attempting suicide twice.

“I don’t want anyone else to go through what I have experienced and that’s why I got involved with writing this suicide prevention strategy. Suicide is a scary thing to talk about but this strategy will help to make sure that children and young people’s needs are taken seriously.”

That’s the view of a 20 year old young woman in Sheffield who is one of a number of young people who have helped produce and launch Sheffield’s new Young People’s Suicide Prevention Pathway.

Sheffield City Council’s Every Child Matters 2015 survey shows that over a third of young people in Sheffield in year 10 (aged 14 and 15 years old) have had feelings so bad that felt they couldn’t cope with them.  Sheffield City Council has therefore been working with Sheffield Futures, Chilypep, NHS Sheffield Clinical Commissioning Group, Sheffield Children’s NHS Foundation Trust and Sheffield Safeguarding Children Board to create the strategy to help reduce the risk of suicides and support young people to have good mental health.

The strategy is aimed at frontline practitioners to help them support young people at risk of suicide. It is part of a raft of new local initiatives supporting children and young people’s mental health, including:

 ·         A better link between child and adolescent mental health services and  schools.

·         A one stop shop for advice and counselling service for young people up to the age of 25.

·         Training for schools on a range of mental health issues.

·         Support for families, friends and those affected by children and young people’s suicide.

·         A tool to support practitioners working with young people and domestic abuse.

This comes on top of Sheffield’s existing programme which has seen ten schools provide emotional wellbeing support to its pupils and staff. 

Becky, who is quoted above, aged 20, is part of STAMP (Support, Think, Act, Motivate, Participate) a group of young people aged 14-25, facilitated by Chilypep who are funded to involve young people in working to improve the mental health and emotional wellbeing of young people across the city as part of Sheffield’s Local Area Transformation Plan.  The group has created a film to support the launch of the strategy, as well being involved in developing the strategy itself.

Councillor Jackie Drayton, Cabinet Member for Children, Young People and Families at Sheffield City Council, said: “ We want  to create an emotionally healthy and wealthy city and this strategy that builds on our healthy minds work will help us to achieve this.

“Young people have told me that having a safe place to talk and get help early, is a vital part of helping them overcome stress and preventing their problems from getting worse. Through this strategy we will ensure that the support is there for our children and young people to do this.”

The new pathway was launched on 16 March at an event at the Town Hall attended by 200 children and young people professionals. You can read the Suicide Prevention Pathway here.

The film is available online at https://1drv.ms/f/s!Ah7J7bAZnjgEmnE7NY5Z8kXIxjq_

Sheffield Futures launches young people’s guide to life

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Sheffield Futures has released the third edition of their Mi Book which helps young people to live a safe and healthy life.

The content of the book was decided by young people from local schools and members of the Sheffield Young Advisors; trained 16-19 year olds who offer consultation services to services and businesses to make them youth-appropriate.

The young people agreed that their peers needed information around drugs and alcohol, pregnancy, mental health, sexual health, housing, sexual exploitation and bullying amongst many other important issues.

The small, pocket guide has been distributed to schools within Sheffield and is also available from the charity’s city centre premises at Star House on Division Street. Young people are encouraged to call in to collect a copy.

An app to accompany the guide is coming soon which will contain additional information, advice and guidance content including managing personal finances, family break-ups and step families, bereavement and leaving home.

Gail Gibbons, Chief Executive Officer of Sheffield Futures said: We’re really proud to present our latest edition of Mi Book; a pocket guide to life in Sheffield. We hope young people will find this useful.”

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How you can help

Our charity is dedicated to helping Sheffield's young people to reach their full potential and achieve the best out of life, whatever their starting point. To help us to do more to support young people and communities we need your help. Just remember, every penny you donate will make a difference.