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A love letter to yourself

Tash Bright No Comments

I have been working with a young woman for two months at Door43. When she first came to the service she was feeling very low in self confidence and would quite often say things to put herself down. I could see that she is a fantastic person and has many assets, but instead of reminding her about her achievements I wanted her to recognise them herself. She asked me if there was anything she could be doing over Christmas to practice self-care, and I set her a challenge of writing a love letter to herself.

At first she laughed at me and said this is “way too cheesy”, but eventually I convinced her to give it a go and even if she came back to see me in January with one point, it would be a great achievement.

She came back after the Christmas break with the following list and said it was really difficult, and at times she struggled to write the points down, but that now she has done it, she is proud. She plans to use the letter every time she is having a rubbish day or feeling a bit off, when she re-reads it she can remind herself of how amazing she is and the best bit is that these points have all come from her.

 

Dear you, I love you because:

You are amazing. Even if you don’t believe that, it is true. You need to believe in the people around you and trust them on this fact.

You are helpful when your friends are down. You always put your friends first. You’re always there to talk to and always happy to help them.

You are confident. Stop hiding behind this shy person and show people who you really are.

You never give up on yourself. You try as many times as you need to to succeed. Keep going.

You don’t let your mental health define you. Instead, you make it a part of your life and you now want to work with teenagers who have mental health issues, which is great!

You are brave. You have gone through so much in 2017. You were in hospital with no idea what to do and you became this brave person and got through it.

You are funny. You always make people laugh; no matter what mood they’re in.

You are determined. You have dreams that you will never give up on.

You are good company; you are always lovely to be around. You keep everyone in good mood and spirits, even when you are down.

You are the most organised person I know – this is a good thing. You have everything you need at all times – this is not a bad thing!

You are always early and if you were ever late you would panic like mad.

You are friendly and kind to everyone even if you don’t know them. You take the time to talk to everyone around you even if they are the opposite of you.

You are a hard worker. You always give 100% to any work you get given, if even if you don’t really feel like it.

You are creative, you knit, create and enjoy arts and crafts and you need to carry being creative as it’s a part of you.

You are a whizz at jigsaws, you love doing them to music.

You are beautiful with or without make up. You always wear make up to hide who you are when really you are beautiful like a rainbow.

You set your heart on something and you do it.

You are a star, you’re a star in lots of people’s eyes for different reasons (mainly good, so keep being the star you are).

You are you and that’s fine.

“Today is going to be a good day and here’s why. Because today, no matter what else, today, at least you’re you. No hiding, no lying, just you. And that’s enough.”

Love, me. x

Free Money for Life masterclasses by young people for young people

Sadie White No Comments

A series of money masterclasses to equip young people with the skills to become more cash confident and in charge of their financial destiny will be delivered by Sheffield Futures during the first half of this year.

It’s understood that 60 per cent of young people aren’t taught money management skills within education and 42 percent of young people can’t interpret the difference between being in credit and overdrawn on a bank statement. The Money for Life project, a national initiative aimed at young people between 16 and 25 and the result of a collaboration between UK Youth and The Mix, comes in response to these worrying statistics that point towards the need for financial education and support for our young people to enable them to live successful lives in control of their financial destinies.

Using fun and interactive activities and led by trained young people, the Money Masterclasses consist of four one to two hour modules and will cover the following topics:

  • You and Your Money: Young people are introduced to financial basics from reading a bank statement to understanding how tax works.
  • Surviving ‘til Pay Day: All about budgeting and making money go that little bit further. Young people are taught how to create a budget that outlines ways to save.
  • Independence Day: How to survive away from home, from paying bills to furnishing property and getting the best value for money.
  • Your Money Talks: Understanding credit scores, what they are and what we can do to improve them. We ask young people to think about the importance of every day spending decisions and the implications these have for the future.

Commenting on the project Sarah Stevens, Young Peoples Participation Development Manager at Sheffield Futures says, ‘With ever more complicated financial products on the market and the sometimes dire implications for people when they don’t understand them, financial literacy is becoming increasingly important. It really is essential that we are responsible and provide our young people with the information and tools to become financially literate and able to navigate their way through the financial aspects of life.’

‘We’re really pleased to have been chosen to deliver the masterclasses for young people across Sheffield to help fill the knowledge gap and enable young people to become financially responsible and self-sufficient citizens.’ Sarah continues.

The programme is ideal to be delivered to groups of students in higher education or as part of traineeships or apprenticeships. Those responsible for young people in this capacity or young people aged 16-25 and living in the Sheffield area that may benefit from the Money for Life project can register their interest at the following link www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/MFLREG

You can find out more about Money for Life on our website at www.sheffieldfutures.org.uk

Money For Life is funded by Lloyds Banking Group and Sheffield Futures has been chosen as the delivery partner for Sheffield.

Targeted youth support delivers positive destination

Sadie White No Comments

Our Targeted Youth Support (TYS) advisers are celebrating yet another positive outcome for a Sheffield youth not in education, employment or training (NEET).

The young person had been NEET for over one year, after having a negative experience within education and with peers and as a result had become extremely disengaged socially, often not leaving the house and struggling to communicate with family and friends.

The young person had been reluctant to engage with Sheffield Futures previously so Lucy Ruck, one of our TYS workers, worked with him to gradually build up trust and form a positive relationship.

Rather than focusing on the enormity of stepping into full time training and education, Lucy got to know the young person and his interests and used this as a “hook.” He showed an interest in basketball, so Lucy contacted the Manager of Sheffield Sharks and he agreed to come and meet us. The young person needed encouragement and reminders to attend but when he did it was a positive meeting and we looked at all of the options which might motivate him to get out of the house, beginning with an informal basketball session taught at weekends.

This was the prompt that the young person needed to feel that there could be a positive future, so quickly building upon this, Lucy contacted one of the teachers in the community where the young person lived to see if he would do a home visit to talk about a sports based programme. This again was successful. It took plenty of encouragement and for Lucy to support the young person at the meeting – but he agreed to start.

Meanwhile Lucy also contacted Princes Trust. The young person’s parent had been struggling with finances and was concerned this would be a barrier to them starting the programme, but Lucy helped them to apply for a development award which would go towards buying kit. This took some time but is successfully now being processed and will provide a great incentive for the young person.

Lucy also supported Mum with applying for a bus pass and sorting out her child benefit – again it became quickly obvious that this could be a barrier and so this was actioned as quickly as possible.

When the young person was due to start his course Lucy  ensured she had good contact with the young person and his family to encourage him through the transition.

Lucy went to see the young person and his Mum two weeks into the Princes Trust course and things have gone extremely well. The young person said he was really enjoying the course, has made friends and is feeling the most positive he has felt in a long time.

Lucy asked them to complete a feedback questionnaire and they commented that they were very pleased with the support they had received, that it had helped a lot, that support was appropriate to need and consistent. The young person said the thing he was most pleased about was making friends, also that he had done some exercise for the first time in a while and it had made him feel good.

Mum commented that she had seen a real change in his behaviour especially in the mornings when they no longer had arguments when she asked him to get out of bed 😊.  She also said that the young person appeared more confident about going out and about in the community and that they were getting on a lot better as a family.

We are pleased to say that the Princes Trust gave really positive feedback about the young person and his progress!

My journey as a youth worker #YWW17

Tash Bright No Comments

First and foremost let me introduce myself, my name is Nazmin Jahan and I am a youth worker based in Community Youth Teams West.

Let me answer a question I’ve been asked a numerous amount of times in the past: “how did you end up working with young people and why youth work?” 

Well, it all started on that fateful day I decided to walk into Star House by myself, after seeing a vacancy on the Sheffield Futures website for Youth Work Apprentices. At this point in my life I was an 18 year old young person, from a Bengali-Muslim background, who had just finished a long two years at sixth-form. I was not a very confident person to say the least, I was nervous about the littlest things for example, making phone calls, meeting new people and attending appointments.

Something I will always remember vividly is the careers interview I had the day I walked into Star House. I was a nervous wreck! It was my first time attending something I found on my own accord and something no one had spoon fed me. So, I’m waiting in the reception area, looking very lost, when a women approaches me and asks me if I am Nazmin, to which I respond yes. I am then led down the hall way (which felt like a very long walk). I am sat down and asked questions like what my grades are like and why I’m interested in the vacancy, I answer each question with a lot of thought.

After all the questions and my very thought-out answers, I am told to come in next week where I will start my ‘Step into Youth Work’ introduction at YASY. I am delighted, but I’ll admit Googling ‘what does a youth worker do?’ when I got home, and I don’t think I would still be able to answer that question and have a definitive definition nearly 7 years on.

That’s how it all started. I worked hard to overcome my anxieties: catching buses, working out where to go, breaking down barriers with young people so on and so forth (whilst also being a young person myself.)

I would not be where I am without the help of my colleagues. When I started I was astonished about the passion youth workers had, and how much experience others had. I was fully supported in all the areas of work I did. If I wanted to deliver a group work activity I was allowed, if I wanted to support a young person face to face I was given guidance and help. Without that support and encouragement I don’t think I would have made it to where I am today, or even be a part of this service.

Youth workers have amazing tool kits – it may differ from one to another but everyone will bring something different to the table. For me, interpersonal skills and being able to break down barriers is essential. It’s like carrying a tool kit with you wherever you go, but you are that toolkit. You use that when you want to; you use it when there is trouble in the youth club or to diffuse conflict, when you approach a group of young people for the first time on detached youth work.

Youth Work is something that will never age, it’s much needed. Working with young people of all ages, from different backgrounds and experiencing different things. You are that support mechanism and that one thing they may look forward to, even if it is one day a week.

Looking back at myself as an 18 year old, I am appreciative of everyone who encouraged and supported me and yes, youth worked me.

Want to feel more cash confident?

Tash Bright No Comments

Are you aged 16-25 and want to feel more cash confident? Are you interested in learning about saving money?

If yes then come along to our FREE Money Master Classes!

Enter your details on the Survey Monkey to register.

Alternatively, contact the Money for Life Team on
0114 201 6655 or 07966245209

With UK Youth and Money for Life.

World Mental Health Day at Door43

Tash Bright No Comments

A new emotional wellbeing service for Sheffield’s young people launches today, Tuesday 10th October, on World Mental Health Day 2017.

The youth information, advice and counselling service which will be known as Door43, will offer Sheffield’s 13 – 25 year olds support on a range of social, emotional, practical and health related issues.

Door43 will act as an accessible drop in service which doesn’t rely on referrals and acts as an informal and safe space where Sheffield’s young people can gain confidential support and advice on a range of issues.

‘With Door43 we’re aiming to provide an informal space where young people feel welcome, involved and ultimately feel that they are in an environment with their peers where they are able to discuss and access support on a range of issues if indeed they feel they want to do so.’ Says Gail Gibbons Sheffield Futures CEO.

‘With stress, anxiety and depression on the rise for young people in Sheffield and the UK, having a safe, casual space which acts as a drop in service and that doesn’t carry the stigma a or practical considerations of a professional referral could make all the difference for a worried or distressed young person.’ She continues.

Door43 at Sheffield Futures on Division Street is staffed by youth workers, counsellors, substance misuse workers, sexual health workers, careers advisors, volunteers as well as peer supporters.

Young people can drop in at Door43, Sheffield Futures, Division Street, Monday to Friday 10am – 5pm, Tuesday until 7pm and on a Saturday 9.30am – 1pm.

You can find out more about the activities and workshops here.

For those that would rather, there is also the option to book appointments.

If you know a young person or young people that you feel may benefit from the service you can refer them to the service by calling 0114 201 2774.

 

Door43 Information for Professionals Sessions

Tash Bright No Comments

Door43 is a new Youth Information, Advice & Counselling Service (YIACS) based at Sheffield Futures. We offer holistic emotional wellbeing support for young people aged 13-25 in Sheffield.

Come and meet the team, see the service, and find out more about what Door43 has to offer!

Join us for an informal information session on how we support young people, and how to make referrals or support young people to access our service. Find out more about the service before you visit.

Book on to one of the following dates via Eventbrite:

Thursday 30th November, 10.30-11.30 at Sheffield Futures, Star House, 43 Division St, S1 4GE

Thursday 15th February 2018, 10.30-11.30 at Sheffield Futures, Star House, 43 Division St, S1 4GE

Thursday 17th May 2018,  10.30-11.30 at Sheffield Futures, Star House, 43 Division St, S1 4GE

Fun Palace – THIS SATURDAY!

Tash Bright No Comments

The Door43 are running a Fun Palace this Saturday at Sheffield Futures, Star House, 43 Division Street, S1 4GE. Our theme is sex and sexual health!

Saturday 7th October 10.30-12.30

Join us for: cake decorating, arts and crafts, card games and more to informally learn about sex, sexual health & porn, in a fun and young person friendly environment. It is FREE! Come along and take the taboo out of talking about sex!

We will have a health and wellbeing worker available on the day for one-to-one screening, information and advice. Find out more about our event or book your place here

The Fun Palace is a national event, encouraging people to learn but also have fun at the same time.

We advise that anyone attending is over the age of 13.

Our new Wellbeing Cafe!

Tash Bright No Comments

Door43 welcomes you to the

WELLBEING CAFE

Every Tuesday, 5pm – 7pm

at Sheffield Futures, Star House, 43 Division St, S1 4GE.

Are you a young person aged between 13 and 25? Come and join us for games, arts and crafts, film nights and much more!

…or if that’s not your thing, simply drop in for a chat over a brew and biscuits.


For more information, email: door43@sheffieldfutures.org.uk or call: 0114 201 2774

Follow us on Instagram for daily updates!

Young people joined Paul Blomfield MP for a Big Conversation

Tash Bright No Comments

Members of Sheffield’s Youth Cabinet and UK Youth Parliament joined young people at Sheffield Futures for a Big Conversation with Paul Blomfield MP. The Big Conversation is an annual community consultation with a variety of audiences.

On 20th September, the Big Conversation came to Sheffield Futures on Division Street for a special event for young people. Youth Councillor for East Sheffield, Fozia Sultana, chaired the event, helping young people to form and ask questions about the issues that matter to them.

The conversation tackled big issues such as ‘making the invisible, visible’. This is one of the issues on the current youth consultation Make Your Mark, aimed at helping invisible illnesses be more recognisable, through better education. Fozia Sultana said: “There should be more opportunities for support when people are suffering with illnesses which are physically invisible.”

The groups spoke about issues facing young carers, many of whom do not realise that they are carers. One young person said: “there should be more support from the Government for young carers, both emotional and physical support. One practical way that young carers could be helped is with free or heavily discounted travel passes, this would be one less thing for young carers to think about.”

 One young person said: “We need a more diverse curriculum. Schools needs to include LGBT+ in sex education lessons, and to have a focus on emotional relationships, not just physical.”

 The conversation also focussed on mental health, with one young person describing their experiences of mental health services. They said: “In the past I gave up trying to access mental health services because there isn’t enough provision for everyone who needs it. There also needs to be a way for young people to access support at earlier stages, rather than when they’re at crisis point.”

Paul Blomfield MP listened to the young people, and said: “I have been given a completely new insight about young people’s mental health which I have never understood before and this has been very useful.”

After calling the event very interesting, Paul concluded: “A common theme in the discussions has been changes to the curriculum to prepare young people for life. Schools are currently measured by success in exam league tables and we could help to instruct schools to include education about life skills young people need for their futures.”

 “Your voice is a very important part of setting my priorities. Thank you all for contributing and your time.”

How you can help

Our charity is dedicated to helping Sheffield's young people to reach their full potential and achieve the best out of life, whatever their starting point. To help us to do more to support young people and communities we need your help. Just remember, every penny you donate will make a difference.