Youth Work

Youth Work Week 2019 Blog: Active members of their communities and society

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Gail Gibbons is the CEO at Sheffield Futures, leading the charity to deliver initiatives that support young people including Youth Sheffield, Sheffield’s city wide youth service. Youth Sheffield provides safe spaces where young people can feel comfortable and confident and take part in enriching activities, keeping them safe and supported to make the most of their lives. For today’s #YWW19 theme, Gail talks about how Sheffield Futures works to encourage young people in Sheffield to be active members of their communities and society.

We strongly believe that all young people have the potential to play a positive and active role in their communities and wider society; and that it is critical that young people are provided with opportunities and supported to do just that. Youth work and the youth work delivery model provides the perfect platform for enabling young people to make a positive contribution to their communities. As well as building confidence, active citizenship through youth work enables young people to demonstrate their capacity to make a difference and to develop soft skills sought by employers. It also enables young people to see the world from others’ perspectives and to develop a broader and deeper understanding of our wider society.

Active citizenship includes young people taking part in formal decision making in local areas. For example, Sheffield Futures co-ordinates the bi-annual national Mark Your Mark Campaign for Sheffield – encouraging as many young people as possible from schools, colleges, youth clubs and organisations to vote for the issues most important to them. The issues gaining the most votes are then taken forward by young people through local and national campaigns and debated by UK Youth Parliament members in Westminster. Our elected Youth Cabinet represents young people across Sheffield, and takes forward issues important to young people on their behalf – making a real difference to how services are delivered in our city. At local level, youth voice is an important part of our youth clubs – where young people are consulted on our youth work curriculum so that it really meets their needs.

Each year hundreds of young people we work with are involved in volunteering and social action projects – giving back to their local communities. Sheffield Futures is a member of the national #iwill campaign – with young people leading on a wide range of social action initiatives. These have ranged from the Woodthorpe Youth Club Social Action Project – which has recently been nominated for a local Community Award; to young people taking part in the annual Keep Britain Tidy litter pick initiative; and involvement with a local youth organisation partnership to raise awareness around issues relating to young people and health.

Our young people have also been involved this year in a number of projects aimed at educating their peers, and supporting the development of local statutory services to enable them to be more relevant and responsive to young people. For example, as part of a Home Office funded Early Intervention Fund programme, Sheffield Futures has trained up a group of young people to act as peer mentors – working with young people in schools to raise awareness about the risks of knife crime and child criminal exploitation. We are also supporting South Yorkshire Police to set up a South Yorkshire Young People’s Independent Advisory Board; and our Young Advisors are supporting the Sheffield Safeguarding Children Board to improve their practices.

Our young people have taken part in a wide range of festivals and events this year – raising awareness of issues which matter to them; and providing suggested solutions to some of the most challenging issues in society today. For example, our young people have led an event as part of the Festival of Debate; have taken part in the Migration Matters Festival; have been involved in Off the Shelf festival; and have an important role in the city’s Age Hub work. One of our Young Advisors also spoke at the recent Northern Powerhouse Conference about young people, work and skills.

If you or a young person you know would benefit from getting involved in any of the initiatives mentioned here and would benefit from support please reach out to Sheffield Futures. Tel 0114 2012800 or [email protected]

Find out more about your community youth club here https://www.sheffieldfutures.org.uk/things-to-do/

 

Youth Work Week 2019 blog: Experiencing positive health and wellbeing

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Aaron Daniels is a Youth Work Team Leader at Sheffield Futures. As part of Aaron’s role, he delivers Youth Sheffield in the West of the city. Youth Sheffield is Sheffield’s city wide youth service. Youth Sheffield provides safe spaces where young people can feel comfortable and confident and take part in enriching activities, keeping them safe and supported to make the most of their lives. For today’s #YWW19 theme, Aaron talks about how Sheffield Futures works to ensure young people in Sheffield experience positive health and wellbeing.

Health and wellbeing issues are on the rise nationally and the issues are well documented, with issues and struggles such as anxiety, depression, low self-esteem and social isolation a common complaint for our young people.

A good way to think about our youth clubs is that they are a gateway for support. Youth clubs provide a platform for young people to engage in activities that have a positive effect on their health and well-being. Young people engage in a variety of activities that cover curriculum themes that include sports, arts and media and life skills. Youth workers frequently consult with young people to ensure that their needs are being met and their ideas are being valued. The stimulating and interactive nature of these activities encourages young people to socialise with others and strengthen their friendship groups.  Throughout the youth work process of relationship and trust building young people often feel able to speak about concerns or issues that are affecting their well-being.

A youth club offers a safe and confidential place for young people to talk, a fun and interactive environment where young people can make new friends and we provide opportunities for young people to take part in half term activities such as travelling outside of the city, meeting new people and exploring future aspirations.  Youth workers are able to listen to concerns around well-being and if appropriate signpost or make referrals to more specialist areas of support.

If we cannot offer the right support directly in our clubs and we identify a need, we enable young people to access the specialist support we have on offer at Sheffield Futures and through our network of partners for example, help with substance mis-use, sexual health, one to one support to get young people back on track, support to give young people a voice and emotional and wellbeing support through our Door 43 service.

If you or a young person you know is experiencing any of the issues mentioned here and would benefit from support please reach out to Sheffield Futures. Tel 0114 2012800 or [email protected]

Find out more about your community youth club here https://www.sheffieldfutures.org.uk/things-to-do/

Youth Work Week 2019 blog: Safe and confident in their future

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 Shelly Burrell is a Youth Work Team Leader at Sheffield Futures. As part of Shelly’s role, she leads the delivery of Youth Sheffield, Sheffield’s city wide youth service. Youth Sheffield provides safe spaces where young people can feel comfortable and confident and take part in enriching activities, keeping them safe and supported to make the most of their lives. For today’s #YWW19 theme, Shelly talks about how Sheffield Futures works to ensure young people in Sheffield feel ‘safe and confident in their future’.

Young people have the right to feel safe and confident in their future. Young people face many challenges and navigating their way through the teenage years can be difficult.

In today’s world, young people face intense pressure to perform at school, to conform in terms of self-identity, sexual identity, relationships and friendships. And on top of this, in recent times, young people have been exposed and left vulnerable to exploitation, intent on exploiting this period of instability in young people’s lives for their own financial gain.

Young people that are at risk of or are being exploited are given a false sense of direction and belonging, and exposed to danger that can tragically result in the loss of life through knife crime and other serious violence.

Tragically, child sexual exploitation is also a prevalent issue affecting the safety of our young people, where again, criminals are taking advantage of young people sexually who may be looking for friendship, direction or support.

Young people have the right to feel safe and to be protected from exploitation and at Sheffield Futures we strive to ensure this.

Young people are passionate about their future but are unsurprisingly anxious about what may lie ahead. More and more young people struggle with their mental health, with a huge increase in young people presenting with low mood, anxiety and depression. These issues, if left alone can result in the development of serious mental health issues. If we see young people presenting with these issues we can offer them support through our emotional health and wellbeing service Door 43 and other specialist services

With the changes in the PSHE curriculum, schools often don’t have enough time to teach many much needed life skills. Therefore youth work and youth work settings are one of the places were young develop life skills that equip them for adult life.

Youth workers build relationships with young people and offer a confidential safe space for them to access, where they will not be judged irrespective of race, sexual identify, gender, culture or beliefs.

A good way to think about our youth clubs is that they are a gateway for support. If we cannot offer the right support directly in our clubs and we identify a need, we will enable young people to access the specialist support we have on offer at Sheffield Futures and through our network of partners. For example, help with substance mis-use, sexual health, one to one support to get young people back on track, support to give young people a voice and emotional and wellbeing support.

As part of our enrichment activities and curriculum in the youth clubs, we deliver sessions that are young people led, addressing issues that matter to them and their futures such as knife crime, domestic violence, exploitation, relationships, cyber bullying, sexual health and mental health.

Informal learning in youth club settings encourages young people to be resilient, confident and to make better choices, which in turn makes them more safe and confident in their future.

Young people also get involved in the Sheffield Futures Young People’s Independent Advisory Group for South Yorkshire Police, where young people provide support to the police to help them shape their service on issues such as stop and search and retailers illegally selling to underage young people.

We hope that by offering Sheffield’s young people a safe space and surrounding them with enriching activities and a network of support, we can enable young people to feel safe, confident and able to go on and lead positive, fulfilled lives.

If you or a young person you know is experiencing any of the issues mentioned here and would benefit from support please reach out to Sheffield Futures. Tel 0114 2012800 or [email protected]

Find out more about your community youth club here.

Youth Work Week 2019 blog: Skilled and equipped to learn and earn

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Louise Ellison is the Deputy Services Manager here at Sheffield Futures. As part of Louise’s role, she manages the delivery of Youth Sheffield, Sheffield’s city wide youth service. Youth Sheffield provides safe spaces where young people can feel comfortable and confident and take part in enriching activities, keeping them safe and supported to make the most of their lives. For today’s #YWW19 theme, Louise talks about how Sheffield Futures works to ensure young people in Sheffield are ‘skilled and equipped to learn and earn’.

In my experience it starts with creating the right environment. Bringing young people in and building trust, making young people feel valued by society and instilling belief that they have the potential to achieve and succeed, especially if they are low in confidence initially.

Our city-wide youth service Youth Sheffield provides safe spaces where young people can feel comfortable and boosted, in a space physically and mentally where they are able to access their own potential to learn and earn. Like everything, the conditions need to be right for young people to grow and thrive.

The key to creating the right environment for this is investment in highly skilled and trained youth workers who can not only involve young people in enriching activities, but help keep them safe and inspire and support them to make the most of their lives.

Youth Sheffield is led by a team of youth work team leaders who coordinate a curriculum of activities, including sports, arts and life skills that draws upon the expertise of partners in communities around Sheffield. This curriculum is delivered across 20 youth centres, and through street based youth work, for those who are not able to access a club.

Through our work giving young people the tools to use their voice and influence through social action projects, for example with the #iwill Ahead partnership, we recognise the value and necessity of working with skilled organisations to deliver opportunities for our young people and welcome approaches from all interested parties in this capacity.

Once we feel young people are in a place where they are ready to access support, they are engaged in an age appropriate way to address specific learning or employment options. From here, young people are given access to one to one support to help them get back on track with work, training, education and to lead productive, independent lives. For example, school aged young people can access Sheffield Futures careers advice in school, and here at Star House and this support extends for those with special educational needs and disabilities up to the age of 25.

Youth workers are also so well placed to spot warning signs, when young people are at risk of losing direction in life. They might be missing school, work or being involved in anti-social behaviour in or outside school. The reasons for this can be complex but youth workers are able to work with young people to dig deeper and understand what’s going on at home and if there are problems with emotional health and wellbeing, like anxiety or other mental health conditions.

Lack of structure and a chaotic home environment can unsurprisingly really influence a young person’s ability to lead a productive life. Our targeted youth support workers provide bespoke practical and emotional support to cater to the complex needs of those at risk of becoming not in education, employment or training or those that already are. It’s a form of safety net. This support is available for all young people including some of the most vulnerable, for example those that have been living in care. There’s also one to one support available for young adults aged 20-24 who find themselves directionless as a result of mental health issues.

If you or a young person you know is experiencing any of the issues mentioned here and would benefit from support please reach out to Sheffield Futures. Tel 0114 2012800 or [email protected]

Find out more about your local community youth club here.

We launch our new approach to youth work ‘Youth Sheffield’

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Our charity has revamped the way youth services are offered across the city and raised £20,000 to kick start our new ‘Youth Sheffield’ programme.

Our team at Sheffield Futures currently leads up to 40 youth work sessions a week, funded by Sheffield City Council. With the Council’s support, our charity is now transforming the way it works with young people, but we need on going funding and help from the wider community to give young people the youth service they truly deserve.

Our CEO at Sheffield Futures, Gail Gibbons said: “‘Investment in youth work is needed more than ever after years and years of significant Government cuts to children and young people’s services nationally.

“We’re seeing, not only in Sheffield but across the country, major problems such as the rise in young people’s mental health issues, exploitation of vulnerable young people and associated violent crime.

“We believe that investment in highly trained youth workers, who can not only involve young people in enriching activities, but help keep them safe and inspire and support them to make the most of their lives, is key.”

The refreshed city-wide youth service, ‘Youth Sheffield’, will be led by a new team of youth work team leaders who will coordinate a curriculum of activities, including sports, arts and life skills. This curriculum will be delivered across 20 youth centres, and through street based youth work, for those who do not feel able to access a club.

Gail, said: “It’s so important that all young people, no matter their circumstances, are given the opportunity to access high quality youth provision. Sometimes that can mean engaging young people on their own territory, on their own terms, on the streets or in local parks for example.

“However, we hope that over time, we are able to bring more and more young people into our youth centres, but we can’t do this alone.

“To reach as many young people as possible, particularly those who are most in need, we must work closely with partners such as the Council, South Yorkshire Police and many of the other fantastic organisations we have in this city that have young people’s well-being firmly at their heart.”

As part of this work, Youth Sheffield plans to develop a new youth work network, known as Sheffield Youth Partnership, to provide support to other youth work organisations, to share information and resources, and upskill those who work with young people locally.

The £20,000 donation made by Sheffield Futures has launched the programme, but we’re looking for additional sources of funding to help expand and continue the work, as well as support from community organisations and volunteers.

Organisations and individuals that would like to collaborate and be part of the Sheffield Youth Partnership, or support Youth Sheffield can email [email protected] for more information. We’d love to hear from you.

We welcome Government pledge to invest £500m in youth centres

Sadie White No Comments

The Chancellor has pledged £500m over five years for youth centres and services across the country.

Our CEO, Gail Gibbons, responded to the news by saying investment in good quality youth work is needed now more than ever.

Gail, said: “We very much welcome this pledge from the Government to invest in much needed youth services.

“After years of significant cuts affecting youth services in the Sheffield and South Yorkshire region, we hope this latest announcement signals the start of sustained long term investment in youth services.

“In recent years, we have seen the growth in serious youth violence, risk of exploitation and the rise in young people’s mental health and emotional well-being problems.

“We very much look forward to seeing the details behind this pledge and seeing it come to fruition. We are ready and waiting to welcome this investment in our region and to work collaboratively with partners and young people to make the vision a reality in our communities.”

Our charity runs youth clubs across Sheffield and our Community Youth Teams support young people aged ten to 18, through one-to-one support, group work programmes, in youth centres and out in their communities.

Bridging the Gap: Improving Communication Between Young People and the Police

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Sheffield Futures hosted a Festival of Debate event to discuss Bridging the Gap, improving communication between the police and young people in our city. The event looked at how can the police better communicate with young people, why wouldn’t a young person report a crime and what can be done to change that?

Following on from Sheffield Youth Cabinet’s knife crime consultations with young people, we wanted to start a discussion to see how we can work together for a better, safer Sheffield.

The group looked at community policing and how stronger links could be made between the police and young people. Feedback stated that “police should be aware of people’s mental health” and that when appropriate, “police should laugh with young people.”

The group felt that recruiting younger PCSOs would be beneficial and there should be a police presence in areas where it is lacking.

The group also discussed what areas are best to engage with young people and the wider community, what would work best for young people, that may not work for the wider community and whether communications needed to be improved with the whole community and not just young people.

They also looked at whether in a time of cuts, what alternatives might there be to improve police presence, including Neighbourhood Watch. Some young people felt that it was important to increase “early years school visits” to “reduce stigma of the police.”

The attendees were split into three groups and moved to three discussion areas, each group getting an opportunity to speak about the three identified themes. One theme was perceptions of the police in 2019.

Some of the young people said they “hate the police, they’re too quick to blame people who are non-white.”

“It’s not just colour, but also about what area you live in.”

“The police don’t go to areas where they don’t sell drugs, but they should go everywhere.”

“I see the police as a gang but they can keep people safe in some respects like abuse against children.”

One of the young people had a different experience with the police when they were with their Youth Justice Service worker. They described their experiences as positive.

The third discussion topic was online presence and what would work when trying to communicate with young people. The group said: “humorous videos, but not patronising ones” would be good and that it was okay for the police to “use all social media except Snapchat.”

“Communication doesn’t have to only be online, it should be face-to-face.”

“Police have a negative image and they need to work on how they’re perceived. Social media should help to humanise the police.”

One young person said “there is a perception of the police as being threatening.”

“There is a fine balance between uniform being for creating safety and enforcement.”

One said “there should be a guide to how to contact the police online, for young people.” “The police need to create a helpline which feels accessible to young people and is young people friendly.”

Young people fed back that their most used social media is Instagram, followed by Twitter, Snapchat, Whatsapp and finally Facebook.

Some believed that it would be appropriate for the police to use these channels and provide approachable and friendly content.

One young person said that it was important to “address online cyber crimes including selling drugs and methods for young people to pass on information.”

“Transparency is important and police posts could create get their messages out.”

The attendees then joined together with a Q&A session with the police. The group were joined by Superintendent Paul McCurry, Superintendent Melanie Palin and Sergeant Simon Kirkham to discuss some of the issues that were raised in the debates and discussions.

Young people challenged the police about racism in the police force and stated that the police had no presence in their communities. Sergeant Simon Kirkham offered to run sessions where the debate could be continued.

Sheffield Young Advisor Shuheb Miah said that conversation at the debate concluded that there was “ideological bias – police are proportionally from a white culture so they lean more towards their own culture without realising that others view them in a racist light.”

Shuheb continues, “The key issues were trust, faith and the effort to report to the police. Media portrayals create a typification of a certain criminal type which shapes the views the police have of offenders.”

Key issues from the debate include: “interaction and understanding, social exclusion/segregation and partiality (BME- 25% under 25 yrs)”

“United Nation convention of the rights of a child says: ‘Child’s state is a primary consideration in the context’ of them being vulnerable in juveniles justice.”

The Bridging the Gap debate attendees said that “999 police line isn’t very efficient when you’re in an emergency and waiting ‘on hold’ could become dangerous.” Solutions could include:
⁃ “Officers suggest an app is created that on use pinpoints location and creates an individual helpline with a member of the police who can help directly
⁃ Access to social media (Twitter) like the Facebook SY police page where surveillance can occur to monitor safety of online servers.
However… this runs the risk of a ‘surveillance society’ or the ‘Big Brother effect’ where protection conflicts with people’s private lives.”

Shuheb said that the group he was with spoke about the power that police held. One said: “They are bullies by making young people powerless and not listening to what they’ve to say in the wake of implementing justice.”

Others said: “If a good service is given by the police the this good experience will be disseminated to others who then share the positive experiences with the police which they will also expect to find if a situation arises with the police creating unity.”

“The people and their behaviour rather than the race should dictate the treatment.”

One said “When an act is committed it is the behaviour/situation that is to blame and has influenced this act.”

Some of the group felt that their communities would not attend a conversation with the police. “Communities not wanting to attend as an already negative/tainted reputation with the police and they have a lack of faith.”

Shuheb’s overall views of Bridging the Gap event:
🙂 The event helped address issues especially the BME community view
🙂 Issue focus meant that the senior members could not work closely with the groups/members who felt affected by the police processes that did not benefit them.

😞 The police are cyclical by focussing the same old issues again and again when aspects like racism exist and simply talking about them will not remove these ingrained biases.”

      

Official launch event: Project 0114, tackling child criminal exploitation

Sadie White No Comments

Last night marked the official launch of Project 0114 – the project to tackle child criminal exploitation and associated gun and knife crime across the city. Led by Sheffield Futures and delivered in partnership with organisations across the city, the project, is set up with Home Office funding through Dr Alan Billings, South Yorkshire Police & Crime Commissioner.  Project delivery partners are Sheffield City Council, ACT Sheffield, The Unity Gym Project, Broomhall Girls Group, Manor Castle Development Trust, My Life Project, Princes Trust, and Change Grow Live (CGL).

Speaking at the event Dr Alan Billings said ‘When I speak to young people the message is clear that they’re most worried about stabbings nowadays, and that’s got to change.’

‘Criminal gangs are targeting younger people, encouraging them to get involved in criminality. Young people, looking for friendship, are drawn into the gang and through the simple task of carrying a package, may be taking the first steps towards criminal behaviour.’

‘We all need to work together in partnership to educate young people and offer early intervention to ensure they understand the risks and can make good decisions – if approached by organised crime gangs.’ he continued.

Project delivery partners running activities with young people at the event included The Corner, Unity Gym, Sheffield City Council, Broomhall Girls Group, My Life Project and Manor Castle Development Trust as well as Sheffield Futures charity partners GB Boxing who attended to run workshops with young people along with England Netball.

From June onwards, year seven pupils in secondary schools across the city, along with year six children in primary schools in targeted areas, will have six information and skills-based sessions focussed on preventing child criminal exploitation and exploring the effects of knife and gun crime. The series of sessions will be co-delivered by youth workers and specially trained young people in schools.

Young people will be provided with information about how they can seek support to move away from serious youth violence and to understand their rights and responsibilities in this area. This element will form a key strand of the new Violent Crime and Organised Criminality (VCOC) strategy in Sheffield.

A second strand to the programme will see youth work activities delivered for young people in targeted areas to provide safe spaces where they can benefit from the strengths and experience of delivery partners, learning new and inspiring arts, music, media and sports skills. The five areas of the city as identified in the VCOC strategy are Broomhall, North East Sheffield, Manor Castle/Arbourthorne, Burngreave/Pitsmoor and Lowedges.

Gail Gibbons, CEO at Sheffield Futures said, ‘Through Project 0114, we hope to equip our children and young people to be able to steer clear of the serious threat that comes from organised crime, child criminal exploitation and the associated violent crime we are unfortunately seeing become more and more frequent across the city. And, in the areas we know are being targeted by criminals intent on exploiting our young people we hope to engage children in inspiring activities and at the same time offer safe spaces where young people can learn and thrive.’

Project to tackle criminal exploitation of young people begins in Sheffield

Sadie White No Comments

Project 0114 – the partnership project set up with Home Office funding through Dr Alan Billings, South Yorkshire Police and Crime Commissioner focussed on tackling child criminal exploitation and associated knife and gun crime across the city is underway. Sheffield Futures is leading the initiative in conjunction with Sheffield City Council, ACT Sheffield, The Unity Gym Project, St Marks Church, Broomhill, Manor Castle Development Trust, My Life Project, Princes Trust, and Change Grow Live (CGL).

From June onwards, year seven pupils in secondary schools across the city, along with year six children in primary schools in targeted areas, will have six information and skills-based sessions focussed on preventing child criminal exploitation and exploring the effects of knife and gun crime. The series of sessions will be co-delivered by youth workers and specially trained young people in schools.

Young people will be provided with information about how they can seek support to move away from serious youth violence and to understand their rights and responsibilities in this area. This element will form a key strand of the new Violent Crime and Organised Criminality (VCOC) strategy in Sheffield.

A second strand to the programme will see youth work activities delivered for young people in targeted areas to provide safe spaces where they can benefit from the strengths and experience of delivery partners, learning new and inspiring arts, music, media and sports skills. The five areas of the city as identified in the VCOC strategy are Broomhall, North East Sheffield, Manor Castle/Arbourthorne, Burngreave/Pitsmoor and Low Edges.

Gail Gibbons, CEO at Sheffield Futures comments, ‘Through Project 0114, we hope to equip our children and young people to be able to steer clear of the serious threat that comes from organised crime, child criminal exploitation and the associated violent crime we are unfortunately seeing become more and more frequent across the city. And, in the areas we know are being targeted by criminals intent on exploiting our young people we hope to engage children in inspiring activities and at the same time offer safe spaces where young people can learn and thrive.’

Dr Alan Billings, South Yorkshire Police and Crime Commissioner said: ‘Criminal gangs are targeting younger people, encouraging them to get involved in criminality. Young people, looking for friendship, are drawn into the gang and through the simple task of carrying a package may be taking the first steps towards criminal behaviour.

‘We all need to work together in partnership to educate young people and offer early intervention to ensure they understand the risks and can make good decisions – if approached by organised crime gangs.’

Young people fundraising for their youth club!

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Young people who regularly attend Woodthorpe Youth Club, run by Sheffield Futures, have been fundraising to give their youth club a make over. Last weekend, the group took part in a sponsored walk. They took the train to Edale, then completed a 10 mile walk in torrential rain – so much for summer!

Deputy Community Youth Team Manager, John Moloughney, called the group ‘absolute stars!’

  

Woodthorpe Social Action Group haven’t just been walking to raise funds, they’ve been fundraising with bucket collections and taking tins out to their local shops. The group are dedicated to creating a space that’s attractive and safe for all young people in Woodthorpe.

Recently the group were at Woodthorpe Youth Club when PC Briggs came to visit in the van. Obviously the group wanted to sit in the van! It’s great to see the young people interactive with one of the many services working in Woodthorpe and across the city.

 

Finally, here are the group getting the outdoors area looking colourful with potted plants!

  

How you can help

Our charity is dedicated to helping Sheffield's young people to reach their full potential and achieve the best out of life, whatever their starting point. To help us to do more to support young people and communities we need your help. Just remember, every penny you donate will make a difference.