Tag Archives: sheffield

Jumble Sale – 25th July – Division Street

Elliot Walker No Comments

Jumble Sale

JUMBLE SALE! Tuesday 25th July at 1pm – 7pm
Sheffield Futures, Star House, 43 Division St, S1 4GE

Sheffield Futures are hosting our second Jumble Sale, which will include a large variety of fantastic clothes, shoes, bags, accessories and trinkets – on sale all day!

Come down and find yourself lots of hidden gems and bargains!

All funds raised will help Sheffield Futures to transform lives and create positive futures.

We hope to see you there on Tuesday 25th July!

 

 

The Lord Mayor’s Dinner raises a fantastic £700 for local youth charity

Tash Bright No Comments

Lord Mayor, Denise Fox, hosted her first charity dinner ‘The Lord Mayor’s Dinner’ on 30th March at Sheffield College’s restaurant The Silver Plate.

Local youth charity Sheffield Futures were proud to be the chosen charity for the event, which was attended by guests from Irwin Mitchell, Henry Boot, University of Sheffield, Pet-Xi, Sheffield City Councillors and more. The dinner raised a fantastic £700 to support Sheffield Futures to help young people to achieve their full potential.

The five-course meal at The Silver Plate Restaurant was cooked and served by students at Sheffield City College and the guests were full of praise for the food and professional service. Peter Bacon, Senior Relationship Manager at the Royal Bank of Scotland said: “It was a great event with superb food and the college students did themselves proud.”

BBC Radio Sheffield’s morning show host, Paulette Edwards, joined the Lord Mayor and Sheffield Futures Operation’s Manager, Lynne Hilson to speak at the dinner.

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Laurence Gavin, Partner at Irwin Mitchell, said: “We all enjoyed the dinner immensely and we are delighted to be working closely with an organisation which does so much for young people in Sheffield.”

Attendees made pledges to help Sheffield Futures; with some offering time to give careers advice or to encourage young people in to a career they had not considered and others pledged to become an Ambassador for the youth charity.

Guests were wowed by local magician, and the President of Sheffield Magic Circle, Andy Taylor, who made playing cards move on their own, 20 pence coins bend, and diamond rings disappear and then reappear in the centre of a kiwi fruit!

WORDPRESS GV3A0352Lord Mayor Denise Fox said: “I hope that Sheffield Futures can continue getting funding to do the things that they are good at like prevention and engagement and being out there with the young people. Visiting a couple of the Sheffield Futures youth clubs opened my eyes because there were over 100 people there. The fact that so many young people had somewhere to go meant a lot to me because it means they’re not out on the streets being exposed to risks. I do think children are our future and we need to get it right.”

The Lord Mayor’s Dinner was kindly sponsored by Irwin Mitchell in support of Sheffield Futures.

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Be A Sheffield Futures Star This Christmas!

Elliot Walker No Comments

This Christmas, Sheffield Futures are running a special Christmas campaign called “Be A Sheffield Futures Star”.

This is a fantastic chance for local businesses and organisations to support a local charity this Christmas. They will get their name on one of our exclusive stars, which will be displayed on our prominent window front over the entire month of December.

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Sheffield Futures building is located on the corner of Division Street and Carver Street, where there’s a massive footfall right outside at all times of day and night, particularly at Christmas!

By sponsoring a star, you’ll be helping the young people of Sheffield who need it most. You and everyone else will also see your company name on one of our Stars in this busy part of town and know that you’re helping a good cause. We will also list your company name and photo on our website and promote and thank everyone who has become a Sheffield Futures Star on our social media accounts.

Sheffield Futures is a dynamic and vibrant charity, which supports young people and adults to reach their full potential in learning, employment and life to achieve a better future. We deliver a wide range of services for young people, in particular those who are most vulnerable and disengaged in our communities. The voice of young people is at the heart of all our work.

Your donation will support our work towards counselling, activity and enrichment programmes, our equipment store, youth work and mentoring, and many more worthwhile causes.

Sheffield Futures Stars can be sponsored in two sizes. For a 30cm X 30cm star it costs only £25 and for a larger, 50cm X 50cm star it’s just £35! If you are interested then please get in touch with our Community Fundraiser via email at Elliot.walker@sheffieldfutures.org.uk or by telephone on 0114 201 6609.

Why not support our charity, be a Sheffield Futures Star and get your organisation’s name in a fantastic spot this Christmas?

Future Shapers Success

Tash Bright No Comments

Future Shapers is a programme provided by Sheffield Futures that offers personal and educational support to young people aged between 14-17 years old.

Tia got involved with the Future Shapers programme after her mum told her about Sheffield Futures and where to go to get help. Tia said: “I was unemployed, unhappy and I had a lot of worries as I had a lot of stuff to pay for. I was really struggling to find a job…it made me feel sad.”

Once a young person joins Future Shapers they are given their own personal mentor that will work with them to uncover where they need most support and tailor the support to the young person’s needs. Our mentors have helped young people gain confidence, attend extra-curricular activities and search for employment.

“Future Shapers helped me with my CV/cover letters, apply for jobs, and helped me sort out my Maths, so I can have functional skills in Maths,” Tia said.

Future Shapers treats every young person as an individual and understands that every journey will be different. Many young people are given the chance to gain the extra confidence they need to step outside of their comfort zone and push themselves to believe that they can succeed in life. Tia said: “I felt less worried and like something was going to get sorted soon. I felt like I would have a brighter future.”

Since joining Future Shapers, Tia went on to get a series of interviews and has been successful in securing an internship. She is now less worried about her future. “I feel comfortable in knowing that I can approach you Future Shapers if I need further support with anything,” said Tia.

 

If you want to know more about the Future Shapers programme, please give us a call on: 0114 201 2909 or email: future.shapers@sheffieldfutures.org.uk

Sheffield Futures joined Paul Blomfield MP for a Big Conversation

Tash Bright No Comments

Members of Sheffield’s Youth Cabinet and UK Youth Parliament joined young people at Sheffield Futures for a Big Conversation with Paul Blomfield MP. The Big Conversation is an annual community consultation with a variety of audiences.

On 22nd September, the Big Conversation came to Sheffield Futures on Division Street for a special event for young people aged 13 – 18. Deputy Member of Youth Parliament and chair of Youth Cabinet, Eleri Kirkpatrick, facilitated the event.

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The conversation tackled big issues such as racism and the school curriculum. One young person said: “We need a more diverse curriculum. Education can be the root of racism as we don’t understand different cultures and their contributions to society”. Other topics included LGBT people, discrimination and mental health. The young people expressed their concerns about how people with mental health issues aren’t taken seriously or considered ill unless they’re suicidal “Mental health is a spectrum. It’s not you’re completely okay or you need to be sectioned. Everyone deserves the opportunity to talk to someone and seek help”.

Eleri Kirkpatrick, Deputy Member of Youth Parliament said: “The Big Conversation is a great way for young people to speak honestly and directly about issues that are important to us with our local MP Paul Blomfield.”

Paul Blomfield MP said: Sex and relationship education, exam pressures, curriculum changes, mental health services are issues for young people. There are lots of issues to raise in Parliament.”

What Are the Risks of Young People Sexting?

Tash Bright No Comments

When talking about the risks of sexting, it is often assumed that young people do not know the consequences of sharing sexual imagery. Findings from SPIRTO have shown that many young people do know the risks and try to manage these risks by leaving their face out of pictures or using apps like Snapchat.

This week, our Let’s Talk About Sexting Campaign looks into the consequences of sexting and how gender often plays a role in how young people are treated once it has been discovered they have sent sexual imagery.

There are many reasons why young people might sext, which we looked in to last week. Young people may start sending ‘nude pics’ as a way of boosting their self-esteem. They could be pressured into sending pictures or young people may sext as a way of exploring their sexuality as part of their natural curiosity about sex.

It is important to remember that even though looking into the consequences of sexting may be shocking, it is important not to jump to conclusions and judge young people harshly if it has been discovered they have sent sexual images. It is often detrimental to punish young people for sexting, as it acts to deter young people from sharing issues they may be facing and seeking help. The aim of looking into the consequences of sexting is to raise awareness of the risks and legalities that could occur, with the main aim being protecting young people from child abuse

1. Loss of Control

In this digital age we live in, it is easy to quickly share our experiences and detail our lives through pictures via social media. Unfortunately, once a picture has been sent you cannot be sure where it may end up. This is especially important to consider before sending sexual imagery, because once an image has been shared, things can quickly spiral out of control and the young person may no longer know who their picture might have been forwarded to. Digital footprints are notoriously hard to erase.

Young people that have had negative experiences with sexting often talk about the feeling of losing control and things quickly escalating to the point where they felt overwhelmed. This sense of despair was detrimental to their health and well-being and in some cases led to feelings of anxiety, depression, self-harm and in the worst cases – suicide.

It is important that young people contemplate how they might feel if the picture they are considering sending was seen by their classmates, shared on Facebook or seen by their parents.

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2.Sexting and Sexism

Research conducted NSPCC found that culturally pervasive sexist beliefs were rampant in secondary schools and acted as the backdrop in which sexting took place. The discovery that sexism was normalised for contexts for all relationships on and off line meant that girls consistently received harsher consequences (bullying, scrutiny, violence, blackmail) for sending pictures than boys, who were often praised and got ‘ratings’ from their peers for receiving nude pics from girls. The potential of new technology has added another way in which young people can achieve status with their peers. The sharing of images has been linked to young people, usually young men, vying for power within their peer group and using others, usually young women’s images as the means to do that.

As recent as this month, MPs across the country have begun recognising the need for increased awareness and education in schools addressing sexism that views women as objects of male desire and labels girls/women negatively whilst praising boys for the same behaviour. The same research showed that even when girls refused to participate in the sending of photos, this did not mean they were safe from the implications of this practice and routine forms of sexism. Boys who do not engage in getting ‘ratings’ from their peers for receiving pictures from girls were at risk of being labelled gay or anti-sex, while girls are bullied for being virgins if they don’t engage in sexting and ‘slut shamed’ when they do.

MP, Maria Miller stated this month; ‘It is difficult to explain why any school would allow girls to be subjected to sexual harassment and violent behaviour that has been outlawed in the adult workplace…Failing to reinforce what is acceptable behaviour could well be fuelling the ‘Lad Culture’ that the Government has already identified as a problem in colleges and universities.’

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3. Vulnerable to Blackmail

There are offenders that seek out sexual images of children and young people and they can be highly manipulative. They can use fear and blackmail or make the young person feel guilty, worthless or that they haven’t  got a choice. Whether young people send images of themselves to strangers or people they know, there is no guarantee where the pictures will end up. Once an offender has a picture of a young person, they may try to persuade them to send sexual images by saying they will be hurt or upset if the young person refuses. They may then continue to blackmail the young person into sending even more explicit pictures by threatening to post their images online or show them to people the young person knows (school/family) if they don’t send them more.

“What we’re seeing is abusers taking advantage and getting images out of young people and then blackmailing them for more by saying, ‘If you don’t do more for me, I’ll send these to your family and friends,'” Ceop’s head of education, Jonathan Baggaley, said.

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4. It is Illegal

It is illegal to produce, store or share sexual imagery of anyone under the age of 18, even if you are the person in the picture. It is important to keep in mind that though the age of sexual consent is 16, sending sexual imagery of anyone under 18 is illegal. The law criminalising indecent images of children was created to protect young people from adults and sexual abuse. It was not intended to criminalise children. None the less, where police have been notified, the incident will be listed as a ‘crime’ and the young person involved will be a ‘suspect’. Outcome 21 was created specifically for such cases and helps to formalise the discretion available to police when handling crimes such as youth produced content.

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5. Pictures Could be Uploaded on to Porn Websites

Once something has been sent, it cannot be unsent. Pictures and text are easily shared, especially when people are in trusting relationships. It is important for young people to understand that relationships may end and the once trusted partner may use the same pictures to humiliate them. There are whole websites dedicated to this act known as revenge porn. Pictures of sexually graphic content of the individual may have immediate consequences, such as images being uploaded and shared on porn websites for all to see or even going viral and becoming public knowledge to people at their school. In comparison, pictures that have been sent may resurface years later and effect job opportunities in the future and relationships in later life, so think before you send.

 

Next week we will be looking into real life instances where sexting has taken place and what the outcomes were.

 

If you have been affected by any aspect of sexting you can get help from the organisations bellow:

Childline – 0800 11 11 or in an online chat athttp://www.childline.org.uk/Talk/Chat/Pages/OnlineChat.aspx

If parents and carers are concerned about their child, they can contact the NSPCC – 0808 800 5000, by emailing help@nspcc.org.uk, or by texting 88858.

They can also ring the Online Safety Helpline by ringing 0808 800 5002.

Revenge Porn Helpline – http://www.revengepornhelpline.org.uk/ or call on 0800 6000 459

5 Steps To Deal With Back-to-School Stress

Tash Bright No Comments

If you are one of the many young people that have gone back to school today, then I hope you had a great first day! It can be daunting heading back to school after the summer holidays, which can lead to stress and anxiety but we’re here to help. Here’s 5 steps to help you cope with returning to school.

Step 1   Look after yourself:

Sometimes we often forget abut the importance of the basics. Are you getting enough sleep, eating regular meals and healthy snacks. It hard to focus on anything if you’re exhausted and running on an empty tank.

 

Step 2   Talk to Someone:

Ever heard the saying a problem shared is a problem halved. If you’re worried, a good way to rationalize things is to sometimes get it out in the open and share your worries with someone you can trust – perhaps a best friend or a parent.

 

Step 3   Problem solve:

You could write a list of all the things that are worrying you about going back to school and start developing ways you can cope with each of these worries. It’s sometimes best to do this with someone you trust, as they may be able to give you a different perspective on the worst case scenarios you are imaging might happen. For example, If (the worst) happens, what could you do?” or “Let’s think of some ways you could handle that situation.”

 

Step 4   Focus on the positives: 

You should always try and think of positive aspects of returning to school because there may be more than you think. What are three things you are most excited about?

 

Step 5   Get support:

It’s great if you have your own support system but remember there are always people who are here to help. As well as parents and friends – you can contact our team at Sheffield Futures to have a chat about how we can help you.

 

Looking to the Future After GCSE results

Tash Bright No Comments

If you are one of the many young people who received their GCSE results today, congratulations on completing what can be a daunting step. The anticipation of results day can stressful to say the least, especially if you need to obtain certain results to move on to the next stage of your life, such as college.

Sheffield Futures is here to help you. We particularly want to support young people who may feel panicked, as they didn’t get the results they wanted. There are definitely alternative ways in which you can reach your full potential, so know that it is not the end of the world. In fact, there are so many routes to success these days and some may suit you more than the traditional routes you initially pursued.

Here at Sheffield Futures our specialist Careers Advisor are happy to chat with you and listen to your ideas or worries about your future and employment. Our Careers Advisors have the experience to guide you through what options may be available, as well as what may suit your skills and ambitions.

Sheffield Futures can discuss anything from apprenticeships to job hunting with you, as well as going through benefits advice for under 18 year olds.

Call into Star House any weekday between these times: Mon – Thurs: 9am-5pm; and Fri: 10am-4.30pm.

Help raise funds for Sheffield Futures

Tash Bright No Comments

Sheffield Futures is proud to announce we will be donning our trainers and sweatbands and taking part in the Asda Foundation Sheffield 10K run.

The run will be taking place on 30th October 2016 and Sheffield Futures are calling our supporters to get involved and help fundraise for our charity.

If you’re anything like me and the thought of running (besides running for the bus) fills you with dread, worry not. Click here to download a variety of training plans that cater to all levels. To set you on your way, Sheffield Futures will be providing our amazing fundraisers with a complimentary Sheffield Futures running top, a sports water bottle and a Sheffield Futures sports bag.

If you or anyone you know might be interested in taking part to help raise money to support vulnerable young people across Sheffield and are 15 years of age and above, please email Elliot.Walker@sheffieldfutures.org.uk. Sheffield Futures will happily reimburse your cost of entering the race (£ 27.82), if you manage to raise £60 or over.

As well as the huge sense of achievement you will feel after completing the race and raising money for young people’s futures, you will also receive a medal. What more could you ask for!

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How you can help

Our charity is dedicated to helping Sheffield's young people to reach their full potential and achieve the best out of life, whatever their starting point. To help us to do more to support young people and communities we need your help. Just remember, every penny you donate will make a difference.